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  1. #1
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    27.5 upgrade worth the money

    I am currently riding a Specialized Stumperjumper EVO Expert with 26" wheels. I love my bike but wondering if I should consider upgrading to 27.5"... which would mean a lot of cash to get a similar quality bike. I do a lot of singletrack and now downhill.

  2. #2
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    27.5 doesn't offer much of a performance advantage. Probably not worth the cost until you start having trouble finding replacement parts for your old bike.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    Probably not worth the cost until you start having trouble finding replacement parts for your old bike.
    I agree with this although my general philosophy is to ride a bike until most of the parts are pretty well shot, about 7 years it seems.

    That said, I had my first ride on my 27.5" Pivot Mach 4 two days ago. It was a replacement for my 26" Mach 5.7 which had a cracked frame. There's a lot of differences between those two bikes but I must say the bigger wheels DO roll over stuff better, grip better, help roll up short steep sections (i.e. gullies) better...

    So, yeah, don't go replacing you bike just because you think you're missing out on something. But when the time comes take a look at 27.5 and 29.

  4. #4
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    Dont ask here, you'll get crazy answers

    26 and 27.5 wheels themselves, are basically the same thing. "27.5" as a whole package, including the changes in geometry and setup, ends up being significant and, imo, dramatic.

    The fork offset alone is a big deal. I wish I bought a modern bike sooner.

  5. #5
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    If it's just about the wheels, no. The right tires make a bigger difference. If you're looking at other factors (QR vs thru axle, geometry, suspension, etc), then maybe.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Dont ask here, you'll get crazy answers

    26 and 27.5 wheels themselves, are basically the same thing. "27.5" as a whole package, including the changes in geometry and setup, ends up being significant and, imo, dramatic.

    The fork offset alone is a big deal. I wish I bought a modern bike sooner.
    I was only considering the wheel size versus cost. If you start talking about old versus new geometry, then I'd definitely recommend a new bike. The differences there are much more dramatic than just the wheel size.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    I have to say I really love my bike, but my wife does have the 27.5 Stumpjumper that I will have to try and see for myself how different the ride feels... thanks for all of the feedback!

  8. #8
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    If you love your 26er then i'd say carry on riding it. Save your $$$ That's what i have done. My 26er is getting better and better. Love the way it rides.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Dont ask here, you'll get crazy answers

    26 and 27.5 wheels themselves, are basically the same thing.

    And that's not a crazy answer?

    Whoever has 26" and 27.5" rims: put on the narrowest tire you have on both rims, for example 26 x 19.5 and 27.5 x 2.1, then go out riding over small obstacles, like smaller rocks, small divots, roots, etc. Then you will know how big of a difference the two tire sizes are. The 26" skinny tire will get hung up on smaller trail obstacles 10 times as much. Now a fatter 26 x 2.4/2.5 or 2.8 that's a different story, it may be fine. But there is no way a skinny 26" tire is the same thing is a 27.5 x 2.1 tire, no comparison.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    And that's not a crazy answer?

    Whoever has 26" and 27.5" rims: put on the narrowest tire you have on both rims, for example 26 x 19.5 and 27.5 x 2.1, then go out riding over small obstacles, like smaller rocks, small divots, roots, etc. Then you will know how big of a difference the two tire sizes are. The 26" skinny tire will get hung up on smaller trail obstacles 10 times as much. Now a fatter 26 x 2.4/2.5 or 2.8 that's a different story, it may be fine. But there is no way a skinny 26" tire is the same thing is a 27.5 x 2.1 tire, no comparison.
    What are you smoking? I ride both and they grip and roll so close to the same it's ridiculous.

  11. #11
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    About 6 six years ago I built some 650b wheels for my SS. At the time, there wasn't much available and it was a nice idea to fit a bigger wheel in 26". It was an experiment that I wanted to carry out. I think they do in fact roll a bit better than the 26" wheels that they replaced, but the b wheelset was probably better to begin with. As mentioned, it's not like you will have a modern bike just because you have a slightly larger wheel. That said, if you have access to a pair of 27.5" wheels with the same hub dimensions and axle sizes then go ahead and put those wheels in your frame and give'em a roll. If you enjoy the ride, then look into the cost of a wheelset. A used set may well be an option that wasn't available to me 6 years ago, perhaps you can even find new take-offs since all the new stuff is 27.5".

    I also agree with dir-t, if it ain't broke don't fix it. If it's broke then fix, upgrade, or replace.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    What are you smoking? I ride both and they grip and roll so close to the same it's ridiculous.
    I think he rides on a different planet. Why he chose 1.9's is beyond me.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I think he rides on a different planet. Why he chose 1.9's is beyond me.
    Isn't that what all the freeride guys run at Rampage? Side note: Mars is pretty bright right now. Cool! (yeah, I'm kind of a nerd, too - ha!)

  14. #14
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    Changing from a 26" ht to a 27.5" made a noticeable difference in rollover, requiring less effort to pedal over bumpy terrain/less rider input to carry speed though rockgardens etc. Not night and day, but I can certainly feel it.

    The most important part though was modern geo. I went for one of the more "progressive" brands, which resulted in me riding a 10cm longer front center cmpared to the old bike. That alone was worth the change.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for all the feedback... it isn't an old bike, 2014 but I put a decent amount of miles on it every year. It was the last year Specialized made the 26" so got a great deal! The tires are 2.3 wide, I love the technical trails with this bike, it handles great. Sounds like an upgrade for only the 27.5" tires would be a "nice to have" but not a major need.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    The 26" skinny tire will get hung up on smaller trail obstacles 10 times as much.
    Maybe 1000.



    Yeah...no. The main difference is you'll feel 10 times as much confirmation bias.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Maybe 1000.



    Yeah...no. The main difference is you'll feel 10 times as much confirmation bias.

    I'm sure you will think I'm making this up, but a previous bike I had a while back was a 27.5", and I didn't even know it was that size until I got a flat tube and ended up changing the tire. I noticed that the 27.5" bike rolled over obstacles better before I even knew I was riding one. But I'm also sure it's too late to change opinions that are stuck in the past.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kglassen View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback... it isn't an old bike, 2014 .
    That's ancient. The shops & makers want you to buy a new bike every year with all the new 'better' wheels, brakes etc.

    Remember it's not all about the bike. But the rider. I'm glad your happy with the mtb you have. Ride and enjoy. No doubt some will look down at your 26er. That's their problem.

  19. #19
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    Was a big-time 26er hold-out for a long long time. Started mountain biking in the latter 90's. Built everything from rigid single speeds to trail hardtail to dual suspension trail, slope style, all mountain... All 26'ers.

    I've always gravitated back to hardtails because of their efficiency, weight, and low maintenance and cost.

    Never felt much need to hop on the 29er bandwagon. When Jamis nurtured the 650b scene, it hit the scene hard. I felt even less need to change from 26.

    Plus tires changed all this. 29+ was the first time I had a reason to move to a new standard. I almost passed it by due to the Krampus springboarding the initial effort, but when Trek was able to build a fun, playful version in the Stache, I finally caved and hit the ground running.

    Modern geometry, advancements in components, and forward thinking have made a clown-wheeled bike that outperforms my very comfortable 26er in every facet.

    I really don't think I could say this about a standard 27.5...but would recommend the OP demo a good mid level 29er dually / 27.5 dually, and 29+ hardtail.

    Standard 27.5 dually? Not so much.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    But I'm also sure it's too late to change opinions that are stuck in the past.
    Ummm...I have bikes in all sorts of wheel sizes that I swap between regularly. Main ride for the past couple seasons has been a 275+. Going between 26 and 27.5, I tend to notice geometry and suspensioin differences FAR more than a tiny increase in diameter. Your "get hung up 10 times as much" statement is pure fantasy.
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  21. #21
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    If you want different geo go for it. If you're doing it for 25mm taller wheels it's not worth it. Since you said you're not really into DH, I'm assuming more aggressive geo isn't of interest especially considering your EVO is already designed for aggressive trail riding. If you want a cheap option to see if you would like more DH biased geo put an angle set on your EVO. That alone will transform your bike.

    A lot of the added rollover people say they feel with 650b is because of a slacker HA. Just one degree slacker changes your "attack angle" a lot more than people thing. Ride a 26"er and 27"er with the same HA and you'll see how how similar they feel in regards to rollover.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    If you want different geo go for it. If you're doing it for 25mm taller wheels it's not worth it. Since you said you're not really into DH, I'm assuming more aggressive geo isn't of interest especially considering your EVO is already designed for aggressive trail riding. If you want a cheap option to see if you would like more DH biased geo put an angle set on your EVO. That alone will transform your bike.

    A lot of the added rollover people say they feel with 650b is because of a slacker HA. Just one degree slacker changes your "attack angle" a lot more than people thing. Ride a 26"er and 27"er with the same HA and you'll see how how similar they feel in regards to rollover.
    Totally agree with this.

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    If you want different geo go for it. If you're doing it for 25mm taller wheels it's not worth it. Since you said you're not really into DH, I'm assuming more aggressive geo isn't of interest especially considering your EVO is already designed for aggressive trail riding. If you want a cheap option to see if you would like more DH biased geo put an angle set on your EVO. That alone will transform your bike.

    A lot of the added rollover people say they feel with 650b is because of a slacker HA. Just one degree slacker changes your "attack angle" a lot more than people thing. Ride a 26"er and 27"er with the same HA and you'll see how how similar they feel in regards to rollover.
    Thanks! To change the angle, would it be as simple as an off-set bushing? Riding with Pike shocks with 150mm travel and current head angle is 67 degrees...

  24. #24
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    People tend to focus on wheel diameters but going to a newer geo frame is just as big a change when compared to a more traditional designed frame.

    I was really happy with my 2012 SC Heckler (26 X 2.4) but it was time for an upgrade. Stayed with the 150ish travel and bought 2018 Kona Process 153 (27.5 X 2.5). Being a 'clyde' I need XL framed bikes and the New England terrain I ride is tight and technical so with that big frame size I wanted the maneuverability of 27.5 vs 29. Noticed the bigger wheels a little bit but by far the biggest difference was the geo of the bike.

    Converting your existing 26" to 27.5" will make some difference but I don't think it will be huge if tire width is similar.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kglassen View Post
    Thanks! To change the angle, would it be as simple as an off-set bushing? Riding with Pike shocks with 150mm travel and current head angle is 67 degrees...
    With off set bushings you need to make sure the rear tire won't contact the seat tube at bottom out. Most frames this won't be an issue but there are bikes out there were it's an issue. You might feel a slight difference in suspension feel too because you are essentially increasing your sag. For those reasons I would go with an angle set. An EVO at 66 HA would be a mean machine on par with anything you can buy in 2018. If it was my bike I would run a 160 or 170mm fork and angle set but I'm all about a major bias towards DH. For all around use, 66 HA and 150 fork will be great. Honestly the EVO SJ is an underrated aggressive trail bike. I think a lot of people hear stump jumper and don't realize the EVO is its own model. You've got a great bike!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    With off set bushings you need to make sure the rear tire won't contact the seat tube at bottom out. Most frames this won't be an issue but there are bikes out there were it's an issue. You might feel a slight difference in suspension feel too because you are essentially increasing your sag. For those reasons I would go with an angle set. An EVO at 66 HA would be a mean machine on par with anything you can buy in 2018. If it was my bike I would run a 160 or 170mm fork and angle set but I'm all about a major bias towards DH. For all around use, 66 HA and 150 fork will be great. Honestly the EVO SJ is an underrated aggressive trail bike. I think a lot of people hear stump jumper and don't realize the EVO is its own model. You've got a great bike!
    That is some excellent feedback and I appreciate all of the help! I have been doing more DH but we are rather limited here in Wisconsin (although Little Switz is great and made the trip to Spirit Mountain in Duluth - Copper Harbor is next in August!). I will try the 66 HA and let you know how that works out. Thanks again!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kglassen View Post
    I am currently riding a Specialized Stumperjumper EVO Expert with 26" wheels. I love my bike but wondering if I should consider upgrading to 27.5"... which would mean a lot of cash to get a similar quality bike. I do a lot of singletrack and now downhill.
    Honestly, you say you love your bike, if so, and if it is not that old, I would still ride it. 27.5" wheels feel very similar to 26" wheels, but with heavier tires. I honestly, find no difference between the two wheel sizes. As people said, do it because you want to change geometry or something else.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Honestly, you say you love your bike, if so, and if it is not that old, I would still ride it. 27.5" wheels feel very similar to 26" wheels, but with heavier tires. I honestly, find no difference between the two wheel sizes. As people said, do it because you want to change geometry or something else.

    What tire widths were the 26" vs. 27.5"? That can make a huge difference. Terrain too. If it's smooth hardpack, I agree there is no noticeable difference. If it's rougher terrain, you really should quickly notice a difference. Maybe your terrain is smoother than mine, maybe that's the difference. But I'm sure this post will be 'moderated' with someone who really doesn't moderate. They instead subjectively take one side and pretend their opinion is the only thing that counts. That's not moderating. The new admin should look into this pattern.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    What tire widths were the 26" vs. 27.5"?
    With equal tires the wheel size makes very little difference between these two. Don't confuse the issue (as usual).

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    What tire widths were the 26" vs. 27.5"? That can make a huge difference. Terrain too. If it's smooth hardpack, I agree there is no noticeable difference. If it's rougher terrain, you really should quickly notice a difference. Maybe your terrain is smoother than mine, maybe that's the difference. But I'm sure this post will be 'moderated' with someone who really doesn't moderate. They instead subjectively take one side and pretend their opinion is the only thing that counts. That's not moderating. The new admin should look into this pattern.
    If you're talking about me again, I'm not a moderator anymore. Got sick of certain types of people crying constantly that 'the moderator is picking on me' when in fact, they really just had no clue what they were talking about and got all sorts of butthurt when corrected. Ahem.

    If you're changing tire widths, tread patterns and volume at the same time as changing wheelsize, then you have no way of knowing what is doing what. As has been explained to you on many occasions; don't know why it is you refuse to learn.

    Besides that, you tend to wildly exaggerate and throw around all sorts of baseless absolutes, like certain trails you ride being 'impossible' for anyone to ride on a singlespeed, or with a 7 speed, or rocky sections that would be 'impossible' to ride on a 26" but no problem on a 27.5 or 29, or 26" wheels getting hung up "10 times more", even though you could take 2 seconds and find a million videos of people killing it over ridiculous terrain on them.

    If I were you, I'd take a look at the experience levels of all the people who have come to a completely different conclusion than you have and consider the fact that it's very likely that they know a lot more than you. Try learning something instead of just throwing a bunch of shit (and numbers) at a wall and hoping some of it sticks. Not all opinions are created equal.
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  31. #31
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  32. #32
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    Daaaaaaaaamn.

    For some of us, riding a bicycle is really big part of our lives. Like a REALLY big part. To some of us, of course a new bike is worth it! To some other people, no matter how different or better a new bicycle product is, its hardly worth anything to them, and they'll be happy on their 1992 stumpjumper that they take around the block once every other year. "Worth it" threads are always a little lopsided.

    I tried a new bike and bought one. Not that I was so blown away or anything, but it was new bike time and I gladly embraced the changes. I think anyone who goes in with such strong biases for this or that standard is doing themselves a disservice right off the bat.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by justwan naride View Post
    The most important part though was modern geo. I went for one of the more "progressive" brands, which resulted in me riding a 10cm longer front center cmpared to the old bike. That alone was worth the change.
    What the hell are you talking about? My '98 Ellsworth Truth already had that 'Modern' geometry 20 years ago. Even though its XC, it also has a slack head tube like most downhill bikes. It's one of the reasons I love it and still ride it. Sounds like the bike you had just sucked in that department and no reason to put down all 26ers.
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  34. #34
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    I was pretty happy with my Mach 5.7c, but the newer geometry was kind of intriguing to me so I decided to take the plunge. Yes, I probably like it better, but I'd still be fine riding the 5.7 around, too. Who knows...I may buy it back from my son down the road

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neuner View Post
    What the hell are you talking about? My '98 Ellsworth Truth already had that 'Modern' geometry 20 years ago. Even though its XC, it also has a slack head tube like most downhill bikes. It's one of the reasons I love it and still ride it. Sounds like the bike you had just sucked in that department and no reason to put down all 26ers.
    No, your 1998 ellsworth has nothing close to modern geometry.

  36. #36
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    This has been enlightening as my first post on here... lots of good information and many opinions. Plan on keeping my 26er for now and incorporating an offset bushing to change the head angle to be a little more aggressive. The bike is a great ride (Stumpjumper FSR Expert EVO) and a better feel compared to the 2017 Stumpjumper FSR Comp with 27.5" wheels. Thanks!

  37. #37
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    I've been hardcore 26" up until 3 months ago when I upgraded from 2012 blur ltc 140mm fully work, enve,Pike 160mm,xtr,ks, Thomson to rocky slayer 165,180 fox x2,36, xt, renthal, ks, shitty alloy roval wheels.

    I have to say the Slayer is s lot better bike. It's faster uphill, downhill on the flat, in the tech. It's just plain better all-round. Modern Geo combined with a faster rolling wheel is awesome.

    I do miss the stupid stiffness and precision of my enve 26" wheels. The rovals are noodle wheels by comparison. Then funds allow ill upgrade to some carbon 27.5 wheels.

  38. #38
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    Side note. I wasn't expecting to enjoy boost spacing
    But the extra tyre clearance it affords in the mud is awesome.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kglassen View Post
    I am currently riding a Specialized Stumperjumper EVO Expert with 26" wheels. I love my bike but wondering if I should consider upgrading to 27.5"... which would mean a lot of cash to get a similar quality bike. I do a lot of singletrack and now downhill.
    Kinda late to the party, but I thought I'd weigh-in with my experience. I ride an "ancient" 2012 Specialized SX Trail which was the last year they made a 26" bike, I believe. Anyway, its geometry is very aggressive and "modern" (low bottom bracket, 65 degree HA, short stem/longer reach, etc.). I did some measurements this past winter and determined that my fork would safely fit a 27.5 wheel, even with a Minion 2.5 WT.

    So that's what I did -- bought a Hope DH wheel and installed it. The outer diameter with a 2.5" Minion DHF is almost dead-on 27.5" -- it is exactly 27" with my 26" wheel and 26" Minion...so, not a huge difference.

    Here's what I notice:

    *Slightly* better traction while cornering, and *slightly* less handlebar feedback on chatter/braking bumps.

    I am not any faster, according to my stopwatch.
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