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  1. #501
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    Manitou and XFusion make 26" forks with straight steerers at reasonable prices.

  2. #502
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    would you be interested in a 2010 Marzocchi 55 RC3 ti w/ an Avalanche cartridge, straight 1/8 steerer?
    Quote Originally Posted by Brodino View Post
    I have seen those Fox forks too but at $900 I ruled them out due to cost. It was just throwing money away i thought. I am now keeping an eye on Ebay but so far nothing. I think I am now leaning towards just buying newer used bike just for the ease of finding parts. It just sucks because minus the crappy fork I have, the rest of my bike is in decent shape.
    breezy shade

  3. #503
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    It's been a good long time since I posted my feelings about my 26" AMHT vs my 29+ AMHT...I did a head to head review elsewhere, but since my thread here popped back up, I thought I'd do a long term review follow-up.

    When I first bought my Stache, my intention was to keep it stock. I've never kept a bike stock, so I don't know why I thought I could do it this time, hehehe. The Stache now is built very similar to the Komodo regarding fork travel, wheelset, BB height, CS length. I still love riding my 26, but I'll let my review do the rest of the talking:



    I did an "Apples to Apples" (mangos to squash) comparison today of the 2005 vs 2017 in the hardtail mountain bike world.



    26? What's the point??!!-1198941d1526822865-26-staunch-hold-out-clown-wheels-img_20180518_182251264-picsay.jpg
    Subject 1: 2005 Freeride Hardtail (which today translates as "All Mountain Hardtail")

    28.5#, Hope Stans wheelset, 32x150mm Rockshox Sektor fork 1x10 drivetrain, 26x2.4" tires, disc brakes.
    68' head angle, 425mm chainstays, 625mm effective top tube




    26? What's the point??!!-1198942d1526822947-26-staunch-hold-out-clown-wheels-img_20180518_163702248_tojp-picsay.jpg
    Subject 2: 2017 Trek Stache All Mountain Hardtail

    28.75#, Hope Arc wheelset, 35x140mm Rockshox Yari fork, 1x11 drivetrain, 29x3" tires, disc brakes.
    68' head angle, 420mm chainstays, 624 effective top tube.




    26? What's the point??!!-1198943d1526823007-26-staunch-hold-out-clown-wheels-img_20170812_164312302-picsay.jpg
    On paper, they look very similar except for the obvious wheel size difference. Almost like you altered one to fit the wheels of the other.

    Same 6-8mi trail, same direction. Very technical in places, pretty steep in places.

    Results: What a difference 12 years of technology makes. You'd think the only difference would be the ability of the 29x3 to roll over bumps, and the acceleration of the little 26x2.4 bike in the flats and smooth climbs, but I assure you...it goes much deeper than that.

    There's really nothing Komodo tackles that the Stache doesn't do better. The clown-wheeled bike moters up to speed very quickly on the trail & handles just as nimble but much more stable. Comfortably climbs where the Komodo spins out or runs out of gas, (comfort issue) obviously tackles technical terrain without trying, whereas the Komodo's pilot must carefully choose his lines as not to destroy the nice wheelset or veer off trail.

    There are sections that I clean on the Stache 100% of the time that I've never cleaned on my 26.

    Every time I get ready to ride, it gets harder and harder to pull the Komodo down off the wall. It's still a fun ride, but what a difference!

    26? What's the point??!!-1198940d1526822801-26-staunch-hold-out-clown-wheels-collagemaker_20180518_201056206-picsay.jpg

    With the new Hope / Arc wheelset on the Stache, there's really no real life trail difference regarding how quickly it gets up to speed in comparison.

    It climbs any trail with less effort, carves any curves more fun, descends and drops with more confidence.



    26" will still get ridden. I still love my Kinesis baby. But as a long term 26" staunch hold-out... I'll eat Crow and say it is inferior in every way.

    Though I still ride it.
    26? What's the point??!!-img_20180527_203452375-picsay.jpg
    Last edited by chelboed; 07-05-2018 at 10:41 AM.

  4. #504
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmike24 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Thats the thing getting parts. I recently wanted to get some rim brake wheels...ugh that was a pain.

    People say that you can still get this or that...and yes you can, if you look at the bottom end of the craptastic market, but I really don't want to put a low end boat anchor fork or some cheep heavy flexy rims on my top end frame that I love to bits, I want the good stuff.
    You have to like hit up ebay for NOS that may or may be legit, or go 2nd hand which could get you something good, or get you someone else's old crap that needs a rebuild more than the stuff you're replacing.
    On top of in these parts of the world, either people figure out early that there was going to be a demand for old parts, or they just wanted top dollar from the start, but stuff ain't cheap.

    Took me 2 minutes of searching eBay found a brand new rim brake wheel set XTR 970 rim brake tubeless 9 speed wheels 948.00 bucks plus 60 shipping yikes that's steep for those wheels but they are top of the line just like you looking for. Also found a load more of nice rim brake wheel sets as well.
    what i was meaning is that they don't make that stuff any more except at the bottom end...which is totally understandable, you don't stay in business catering to ultra niche markets just to keep me happy, although I'd like it if they did.
    And yes I buy heaps of ebay, but when the major supply is on the other side of the planet, then hings become an issue, dodgy sellers, issues where you might have to send stuff back, makes you 2nd guess everything.
    Just saying, 10 years ago there was so much stuff around it was easy, 5 years, less stuff, 2 years even less, now less again. Now I don't need anything right now, I'e gotten pretty much what I need for the moment, but in 5 years time? I'm sure there will be stuff around, or at least I hope.
    All the gear and no idea.

  5. #505
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    Well I'll throw in my $.02... I rode in the late 90s/early 00s on a stump jumper 26er. Then came a long stretch where I didn't mtb at all. Early last year I test rode (and ultimately bought) a used '08 Surly KM 29er. I d4mn near flooded the basement when I first rode this thing. I was truly impressed.

    To give a background, I AM a retrogrouch. I drive a stick shift truck, ride a 1975 Honda motorcycle and I don't give verbal commands to my electronic devices. So this isn't coming from a trend-chaser by any stretch of the imagination.

    I then pulled out the old stumpy some months later (that had been sitting in storage for years) and gave it a spin. It somehow all of a sudden felt small to me. Then again, I built up a 26er touring bike (surly LHT) two years back and that feels soooo fun to ride (not on technical stuff, but on roads and gravel).

    So I guess what I've concluded is the 29ers CAN be bad a$$. And 26ers can be bad a$$. It's never apples-to-apples because two bikes with two different wheel sizes are automatically geometrically dis-similar to begin with.

    You can most definitely count me in the save-the-26ers camp. But I'll stop short of bashing the 29ers. Yea sure, the bike industry is about making money. But 29ers have their place.

    I'm still not so sure of my stance on 650b, as I've yet to try one, but my sense is I prefer a bike to be brilliant in certain aspects rather than mediocre in all of them (i.e. give me killer rollover or killer nimble-ness, not a compromise in both)

    I'm also going to throw in the previously echoed prediction that 26ers, and 2" tires for that matter, make one hell of a comeback, likely by 2025. It's like horror movies - they're in they're out. they're in they're out.

  6. #506
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudSnow View Post
    In one of the most scientifically done comparisons of wheel size, done by world cup racers, 29ers were faster than 26ers by much less than half of 1% over a course several miles long.

    This is a car video, but it shows how two completely different vehicles with different strengths become very evenly matched by a mixture of track features.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIggM65KBRk
    Slightly older post but I like it still the same.

    I get tired of the word 'technology' being thrown around so much in the biking industry. Going from 26 to 29 or 27.5 is a change in sizing, not technology.

    I'm 5'8" and ride a 26 still. My friend is 6'4" and rides a 29. Neither bike is better than the other, they just fit the individual better.

    I ride 29s and I go slower. Not because of 'technology' but because it doesn't fit me as well. I feel I'm on a horse and don't perform the same.
    For me, it's not as nimble and I don't climb as well. My friend was slower on a 26 because it felt like a kids bike. It didn't accommodate his large frame. If someone does better on a 29 vs a 26 or visa versa, it's because the bike now fits their size and build better which is the most important factor. When they post these reviews, they need to post their height as well because it is a huge factor. I don't care what you ride as long as it fits.

    True bike tech or engineering is going to a new material like carbon or building something just as strong, durable, or rigid but in a lighter weight. Size change is not.

    In my riding experience of 25+ years, I've seen a lot of BS. The only reason changes are made in most components is so that the bike industry can sell new bikes, components or parts. In addition, the 'technology' hasn't changed much at all. Bikes still weigh 27-30lbs. Still get flat tires, taco'd wheels, warped rims or brake rotors, shocks that blow out or lock up. This one is faster, this one is lighter, this one is more rigid, this one will make you breakfast in the morning... It's all BS that the fools still soak up. Mean while, I'm still kicking everyone's ass on my '98 26" FS.

    I remember the bashing, flaming and trolling when gearing went from 3x8 to 3x9. It's better because A,B, and C. Now those same guys are arguing why 9-gears are better than 10 or 11! Just stupid getting sucked into what BS the manufacturers are trying to spin to their clients.

    And now here we go, full circle. I'm building up an old 26" for my son who has just started to outgrow his BMX bike, which BTW, he could smoke a lot of his friends on because it fit him well while they all had large 27.5" - 29" bikes their dads were told were great but are too big for them to control. Interesting that the majority of the components we're using are very similar to a 'new 26' that MTBR just published an article about - Cleary Bikes Scout 26” and 24” kid’s bikes - Mountain Bike Review- Mtbr.com
    Last edited by Neuner; 07-06-2018 at 05:52 AM.
    'Things you own...begin owning you.'

  7. #507
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    pilot must carefully choose his lines as not to destroy the nice wheelset or veer off trail.
    This is why I love mountain biking. Learned on the technical east coast trails, and the challenge of making it on a difficult section was and is the appeal that brings me back. I get it, that for some it is speed, comfort, ease that matter more... but there are many ways of enjoying mountain biking (it has always been that way). It's just sad that the industry started to dictate what this sport should be like.

  8. #508
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emax View Post
    It's just sad that the industry started to dictate what this sport should be like.

    I agree totally with you. Except nobody is forcing us to buy the new bikes. If people like me didn't buy the 29er etc then it would die off like so many 'new' & better' products that industry/retailers try to sell. I remember when digital watches came out. Now look they are only the mass market 20 watches. Analogue rules still on the expensive watches. And analogue still holds a large market share on lower price watches. The watch buyers didn't want digital. Other products have the same war, records, CD's and now downloads.
    Are mtb buyers different? Weren't they happy with 26er? I was and am very happy with 26'' wheels. Hopefully the 26er will make a return to mass market as before. It is the best wheel size for a mtb.

  9. #509
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emax View Post
    It's just sad that the industry started to dictate what this sport should be like.
    I kinda thought they always did?

  10. #510
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    I kinda thought they always did?
    Yup, at least as long as I've been around which has been a long time.


    I'm like Emax in that I enjoy the technical riding. I think of mountain biking as fast-hiking which most of the time includes technical routes. I'm out for the scenery and the experience, not just trying to go as fast as I can all the time although I can tear it up when I need to. This is what has made finding riding partners so hard. Every one of them that I've either met up with or introduced to the sport has turned into a racer. They go around all of the obstacles in an effort to be as fast as they can. Even widening a trail to avoid simple roots!! Later arguing about the 'technological' advances of their bikes...

    Now that I've gotten my son interested, all of his buddies are trying to get him to race, have a certain bike and wear specific clothing/helmet. Again, frustrating.
    'Things you own...begin owning you.'

  11. #511
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neuner View Post
    In my riding experience of 25+ years, I've seen a lot of BS. The only reason changes are made in most components is so that the bike industry can sell new bikes, components or parts. In addition, the 'technology' hasn't changed much at all. Bikes still weigh 27-30lbs. Still get flat tires, taco'd wheels, warped rims or brake rotors, shocks that blow out or lock up. This one is faster, this one is lighter, this one is more rigid, this one will make you breakfast in the morning... It's all BS that the fools still soak up. Mean while, I'm still kicking everyone's ass on my '98 26" FS.
    When I recently got back into the mountain bike scene I was really amazed at how much things have changed since I exited in the early-mid 2000s. Twenty-nine inch and 27.5 wheels, through-axles with multiple spacing, boost axles, the tapered vs straight steerer debate, 1X drivetrains, 42T rear cassettes, etc. Then I really looked into it and realized the big differences in frame geometry. I think it's a combination of technological advancement at the highest levels (actual for-profit sponsored racing) and good old marketing and capitalism. If you keep introducing newer and betterer pieces and parts then they'll keep sending you their money. The truly clever changes are the axle sizes because then you need to buy a new set of wheels while you're at it. If you don't then you risk instant death with last year's old axle size...as if any sport rider is even remotely affected by the typical axle stiffness.

    There are "kids" that now equate a pre-2015 mountain bike to a 1950s Schwinn. Dude, you gotta buy a new bike. You need a 29er with boost spacing and 150 mm travel or you're gonna die on the trails, man. I set out on a little experiment to see if I could upgrade my ancient-history 1998 Cannondale. I now have nearly all new, modern, technology on my caveman bike. I avoided a lot of hassle by keeping the Headshok but even that upgrade to a modern fork could be done with enough effort.

    I'll get around to buying a new or gently used 2017 or 2018 full suspension frame and build it up just to see what it's like, but I think the end result will be more hype than reality.

  12. #512
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    I tell ya what's the shiz on a 26". Wheelies, manuals, nose manuals. All forms of trialling, street riding tomfoolery.
    My old school dmr trailstar is such a wheelie ing feind!

  13. #513
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    I kinda thought they always did?
    I don't think that's true. It took years for the industry to settle on the steerer/head tube diameter... but since the 31.8 handlebar diameter, to me it seems like we're being just fed new products. I never remember anyone complaining that 25.4mm diameter is too flexible - yet all the manufacturers switched to 31.8mm in a very short amount of time... I used to work in a bike shop and I never remember anyone saying: "gee.. mister I wish that handlebar was 31.8mm"... The problem I'm having with these changes is that these days the old standards are being abandoned for the new. And this is after a ton of bikes in old standard have been sold. Even in road bikes the industry is pushing for disc brakes - which make no sense on the road bike, but it clearly shows that the industry now makes a product, and the uses clever marketing techniques to sell it. They have the data that helps them to do that. I've stopped reading cycling magazines, because it's just a love-fest - everything being tested is great. The saddest part is that we as consumers are the losers - I look at some of the bikes out there and the prices are just crazy $6-$7k and you're getting a 27 pound bike... I'm not a weight weenie, but it just seems like someone is trying to trick me... just like when cnc purple everything was so great until it cracked and broke.

  14. #514
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emax View Post
    It took years for the industry to settle on the steerer/head tube diameter... but since the 31.8 handlebar diameter, to me it seems like we're being just fed new products. I never remember anyone complaining that 25.4mm diameter is too flexible - yet all the manufacturers switched to 31.8mm in a very short amount of time... I used to work in a bike shop and I never remember anyone saying: "gee.. mister I wish that handlebar was 31.8mm"..
    I agree. I preferred 25.4 because you had much more room for light brackets etc. There was nothing wrong with that size. I also totally agree that the industry is pushing unnecessary change on us at a ridiculous pace, probably because advances in design and manufacturing speed allow them to, but I still think they always dictated what bikes we got. They came up with the bikes and tech then sold it to us. I don't think the game has changed at all, only the pace of it.

  15. #515
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emax View Post
    I never remember anyone complaining that 25.4mm diameter is too flexible - yet all the manufacturers switched to 31.8mm in a very short amount of time... I used to work in a bike shop and I never remember anyone saying: "gee.. mister I wish that handlebar was 31.8mm"...

    I don't remember anyone complaining that 1" steer tubes were too flexible, or that quill stems were a problem, or square taper bb's, etc, etc. Seriously, never. Most improvements are incremental and are only realized in hindsight.

    From an engineering standpoint 31.8 makes more sense, and so do disc brakes on road bikes.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  16. #516
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I don't remember anyone complaining that 1" steer tubes were too flexible, or that quill stems were a problem, or square taper bb's, etc, etc.
    Quill stems are shite! Come on, ahead-sets are so much better it's not funny. The thing about 31.8 bars is that I cannot see any actual advantage in the real world. The added strength is not needed, the extra weight is not welcome and being able to fit lights would be nice. I still remember cursing as I tried to clamp stuff to the tapered section of 31.8 bars. Seriously, how are they better?

  17. #517
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Quill stems are shite! Come on, ahead-sets are so much better it's not funny. The thing about 31.8 bars is that I cannot see any actual advantage in the real world. The added strength is not needed, the extra weight is not welcome and being able to fit lights would be nice. I still remember cursing as I tried to clamp stuff to the tapered section of 31.8 bars. Seriously, how are they better?
    So you can go buy a new stem to work with it. Now they've not only sold you a "new and improved" handlebar, but also a stem to go with it.
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  18. #518
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Quill stems are shite! Come on, ahead-sets are so much better it's not funny. The thing about 31.8 bars is that I cannot see any actual advantage in the real world. The added strength is not needed, the extra weight is not welcome and being able to fit lights would be nice. I still remember cursing as I tried to clamp stuff to the tapered section of 31.8 bars. Seriously, how are they better?
    Good thing they aren't doing 35mm bars yet...

  19. #519
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Seriously, how are they better?
    Because a wider diameter bar can be built both stronger and lighter. How are they worse? Aside from your light bracket conundrum that is.


    Of course in 'retro'spect quill stems are inferior but until aheadsets became the norm (took about a year) no one, not even you Mr. Pig, realized it.

    All the old retro parts were skinny, fat is better!
    I brake for stinkbugs

  20. #520
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    I find my handlebars plenty stiff as it is honestly. I worry about trying 35 bc I already get sore hands from my thomson bar. Something that doesn't happen on my enve bar.
    Looking for a Medium Scott Scale frame, preferably a 2012 in 26.

  21. #521
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Because a wider diameter bar can be built both stronger and lighter. How are they worse? Aside from your light bracket conundrum that is.


    Of course in 'retro'spect quill stems are inferior but until aheadsets became the norm (took about a year) no one, not even you Mr. Pig, realized it.

    All the old retro parts were skinny, fat is better!
    Na, everybody knew quill stems were crap...that and the locknut headsets and threaded forks, it was all bad, having to adjust them, swapping anything...it was all just crap, everyone complained about them, all the time, but what else was there? Nothing, along comes threadless, bingo, solve all the issues with no real down side.
    Whereas 25.4 bars,everyone one was happy, but now 31.8 because it's "better"..er OK sure, can I have a new stem with that please.
    One was a step change to a different and much better system, the other is a tiny increment that may or may not actually have any benefit.

    And I'm not saying 31.8 bars are bad in themselves, they're just a std bar now, it's just that companies don't make 25.4 anymore,so when it comes to retire my current bar, it's either buy 2nd hand, hit up NOS from ebay, or buy a bar and a stem (already done that on 2 bikes already).
    All the gear and no idea.

  22. #522
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Na, everybody knew quill stems were crap...that and the locknut headsets and threaded forks, it was all bad, having to adjust them, swapping anything...it was all just crap, everyone complained about them, all the time, but what else was there? Nothing, along comes threadless, bingo, solve all the issues with no real down side.
    There were retro-grouches back then screaming bloody murder because "what the hell's wrong with my 1" quill stem?" and "threads are the real deal bro!" I distinctly remember when people (lots of them) thought index shifting was bullcrap.

    I worked in shops most of my life and almost every "standard" change has been met with resistance. A new stem is about $30. Wider is better
    I brake for stinkbugs

  23. #523
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    What cracks me up about this conversation is that, except for maybe the quill St (and I'm pretty sure I saw that on Universal Cycles), most things that were to of the line when they were produced for 26 are still available. Maybe not the exact model but a reasonable equivalent.

    A couple of years ago, at the age of 44,I got into downhill and decided to buy a DH bike. I went with a 26 2012 Jedi. World cup fork, cane creak shock. Maxxis tires, code brakes, Stan's wheels and saint drive train.

    I've had no problem upgrading/cross-grading parts. Bought NOS wheels (the same ones Cam Zink rides) for $200. Can still get the same Maxxis tires but switched to Magic Mary's. Got new brakes and a newer shock. Rebuild the fork (which is 7 years old at this point) with no difficulty. Handle bars are 31.8 so that's not an issue, but if you're running an older standard and can't afford the stem to go with it, maybe you should look at your saving plan again.

    Yeah. Bikes cost allot. But given the bike is 6 plus years old, from a boutique brand, I wouldn't expect to be supported forever. And 6 to 7 years has to be 18 to 21 in the automotive world. I have a 16 year old car and I don't expect to be able to get current standards for it.

    Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
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  24. #524
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPunchCholla View Post
    Yeah. Bikes cost allot. But given the bike is 6 plus years old, from a boutique brand, I wouldn't expect to be supported forever. And 6 to 7 years has to be 18 to 21 in the automotive world. I have a 16 year old car and I don't expect to be able to get current standards for it.

    Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
    I see what youre saying but I think this attitude towards replacing stuff, generally speaking, is, to a high degree, a product of the industrys intentional planned obsolescence. They WANT us to dump our things and buy new ones.

    On the other hand, we as consumers are not entirely innocent, as a whole.

    I can replace anything on My 1975 Honda cb750 motorcycle (albeit not always OEM) because they garnered a very strong following and a lot of folks still own them and upkeep them instead of tossing them for the latest and greatest. Similarly, and for the same reasons, I can get all the support I need for my 2001 toyota pickup.

    On the other hand, maybe quill stems and 25.4 stems are going extinct because everybody bought into the threadless and 31.8 (whether you think theyre better or not)

    Call me crazy, but I love friction shifting 3x9 drivetrains and i fear for their extinction too, if not enough people buy them.

    For now, though there are only a handful of new 26ers being sold, wheels, tires and compatible suspension options are still plentiful. I think that Whether this remains the case depends to a large degree on whether or not folks all dump their 26ers for 29ers or continue to keep their 26ers and replace the relevant components.

    Having said that, Im trying to offload my 26er mountain bike for the simple reason that I want a hard tail, so maybe Im just feeding the monster too.

  25. #525
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I distinctly remember when people (lots of them) thought index shifting was bullcrap.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hman0217 View Post
    Call me crazy, but I love friction shifting 3x9 drivetrains and i fear for their extinction too, if not enough people buy them.

    ^See what I mean?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  26. #526
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    ^See what I mean?
    Lest my meaning be misinterpreted, I DON'T think index shifting is crap. Nor do I frown on its introduction. I just happen to like friction shifting, at least on my commuter and touring bikes. Automatic transmission has far surpassed manual transmission in automobiles. Doesn't mean I can't personally prefer stick shifts.

  27. #527
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    And I'm not saying 31.8 bars are bad in themselves, they're just a std bar now, it's just that companies don't make 25.4 anymore,so when it comes to retire my current bar, it's either buy 2nd hand, hit up NOS from ebay, or buy a bar and a stem (already done that on 2 bikes already).
    I have an older rigid steel SS bike that I still love riding on a regular basis. When new the bike beat the h.ll out of my wrists on rough trails. Changing to a 2.4 front tire (tubeless) + carbon fork helped some but converting from the stock 31.8 bar to 25.4 did far more to improve ride quality. Lack of availability is a concern for me too since I don't plan on ever getting rid of this bike.
    Mole

  28. #528
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    You guys should check out the frame building forum, there's a guy there making wooden bars. Probably could do them in 25.4mm.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  29. #529
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    There were retro-grouches back then screaming bloody murder because "what the hell's wrong with my 1" quill stem?" and "threads are the real deal bro!" I distinctly remember when people (lots of them) thought index shifting was bullcrap.

    I worked in shops most of my life and almost every "standard" change has been met with resistance. A new stem is about $30. Wider is better
    Yeah sure, you're always going to get retrogrouches for everything, heck I am occasionally (always?) one too...but I also like new tech, always have, one of the thing I like about mtbing.
    I just found in the past/old days/whatever, you had big changes periodically and they were for a reason. eg with the quill stems, they worked fine coming from ye oldie days ("worked" they still were a hassle, but they did the job), but with suspension coming along and people actually swapping forks, threadless made much more sense plus was better...also happening was the swap to oversized steerers, coming about due to suspension as well, more load or whatever...also with the influx of more aluminum frames, 1-1/8 was better than 1 inch...although evolution size would have been more better really but I think it might have been a bit early, not so many susp forks and alu frames or whatever reason.

    So about 1994ish you had a big shift, suspension corrected, oversize, threadless, and that lasted as a major standard for like 15? years and an awful lot of stuff was interchangable.

    Then discs, really became a thing in the late 90's, but from around 99 til say 09 most (at least a whole lot) of bikes could run both (maybe somethng the road bike world could take a hint from), so that was another shift, 2010ish no more rim brakes.

    But since then in the lat 8 years (or there abouts, not being picky about timelines, just a general idea) we've had all sorts of changes that are all over the place
    -31.8 bars
    -35 bars
    -29ers
    -27.5
    -fat
    -plus 27.5
    -plus 29
    -through axles
    -142 rear hubs
    -boost

    and i'm sure there are others, were probably up to super boost or something. But each time it renders old stuff obsolete, where in the older times, they didn't. And yes at times you need to have a total shift in whats going on as tech/designs change that much (eg the threadless/oversize switch, or disc only), but if you actually decide on a standard and do it in reasonable time frames, not such an issue, but make big changes every year, its fcked in the head.
    All the gear and no idea.

  30. #530
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    .....and i'm sure there are others, were probably up to super boost or something. But each time it renders old stuff obsolete

    I guess I just don't see it that way, I've got an old Karate Monkey frame collecting dust in the shed and aside from the 29" wheels and 1 & 1/8 threadless steer tube it's pretty retro. I could buy parts for it and set it up no problem if I wanted but I like my newer bike better.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  31. #531
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    Sorry should have said out of date tech rather than obsolete, if you upgrade bikes every year, or every ten years then you're good to go, but if you want to upgrade you frame every few years, then things will be more interesting if they keep up with all the changes.
    All the gear and no idea.

  32. #532
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emax View Post
    - I look at some of the bikes out there and the prices are just crazy $6-$7k and you're getting a 27 pound bike...

    same here, I have a Kona 100mm double suspension all XT scandium frame from 2010, have a really hard time "upgrading" to newer bikes, because a similar replacement costs 6000$ and its heavier

    I love bigger wheels, slacker head angle, boost spacing... but internal cable routing, dropper seatposts, 1X drivetrains with 400$ cassettes... it seems no one makes old school XC bikes anymore.

    I go to factory demos days and try new bikes, some I would have not been happy at all buying.... RM element is the best and very good, way better than my own 26 no doubt. But too expensive for me at the moment, wish I can some day.

    Still my Kona hei hei 100 is a fantastic ride, I love the range and usability of the 3x9! overall the bike still feels great and fast.

  33. #533
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    Kinda glad I ran across this thread. Im just entering the sport and Im choking at the prices of new bikes. All 27s and 29s of course.

    I think Id rather lay down small bucks for a slightly used 26er. And partly because I wanted to race cruisers after BMX but never did.
    Call me crazy!


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  34. #534
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    All of the wheel sizes available for us to choose from and ride upon are great.

    Riding 26" has become quaint, vintage, retro, and trialsy. Fair enough.

    26 is fun and remains a good way to ride with style.

    One positive aspect is that you sit a little lower, and can get under some stuff, especially with a seat dropper, that you can't on a taller set of wheels.

    Another aspect is that since they are smaller, they can be lighter.

    Yeah I suppose there are some great 26" frames to find, buy, build and ride out there.

    Some titanium hardtail frames with disc brake mounts are floating around out there. I'd consider some of these finds to be among the best out there.

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  35. #535
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    Is that a homegrown?
    Looking for a Medium Scott Scale frame, preferably a 2012 in 26.

  36. #536
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    on the 25.4 handlebars..... I have 620mm wide bars and cant seem to find anything much wider in 25.4......I run lights on my bikes because I am mostly an urban mountain biker and commute to work for more ride time... I ride 26ers because I can keep costs down plus I got my bikes for free or very cheap
    97 specialized rockhopper.- urban beater
    2013 GT aggressor 3.0- urban assault vehicle

  37. #537
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    Just bought and installed a new 710mm wide 6061 aluminum Soma Odin handlebar with 25.4 center. Did my third ride on this today. Very pleased. FWIW



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  38. #538
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    I made the jump to 31.8 to get wider carbon bars. Went from 640mm to 740mm Renthal Fat Carbon Light. Taking them on first trail ride tomorrow AM.

  39. #539
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    Whats a 29er?

  40. #540
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue950 View Post
    Whats a 29er?

    a large wheel size that is in fashion at the mo. Not better than a 26er.

  41. #541
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    what width you were you on before?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Burns View Post
    Just bought and installed a new 710mm wide 6061 aluminum Soma Odin handlebar with 25.4 center. Did my third ride on this today. Very pleased. FWIW



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    breezy shade

  42. #542
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    overall, better is for sure a matter of opinion, based probably more on preference. they are definitely more efficient at rollover of equal sized objects. that's a fact of physics. that's one. I believe there are others.
    FWIW, I ride 26
    Quote Originally Posted by wightweenie26er View Post
    a large wheel size that is in fashion at the mo. Not better than a 26er.
    breezy shade

  43. #543
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    what width you were you on before?
    I threw the Odin 25.4 bar out there because it is 25.4 and 710mm.

    This was installed on a 29er actually, which I recently acquired, and I needed to adjust the cockpit to my liking, and in doing so I actually made a retrospec to a Syncros steel stem with a 25.4 clamp. The bar was chosen to match the stem, and the stem was chosen to match the bike.

    29er bikes are very nice.

    26er bikes are in my stable and are ridden half of the time.

    Bar widths are anywhere from 650 to 720 on the mountain bikes.

    26" bikes are extremely relevant IMHO. Going from one bike to another ensures an outstanding experience on each ride when the terrain is the regular terrain I ride over and over.

    The 26" bike possesses many endearing properties. Others have detailed these properties on this forum.

    Savor the eloquent grammar of the 26" ride. 26" punctuates each ride with the exclamation "follow me!". The other wheel sizes followed.



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  44. #544
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    Ideal wheel size could also be a function of leg length, and the type of riding you do.

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  45. #545
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue950 View Post
    Whats a 29er?
    Quote Originally Posted by wightweenie26er View Post
    a large wheel size that is in fashion at the mo. Not better than a 26er.
    As the author of this thread and a current enthusiast and regular rider of my 26" hardtail, I believe I deserve I little bit of grace for what I'm about to say.

    My Stache is basically the modern 29+ equivalent to my 26'er. Both similar styles of bikes in that they're both All Mountain Hardtails. Both similar head angles, builds, and fork travel...

    ...my Stache is better at absolutely everything than my 26'er. Climbing, descending, level winding through the woods, monster trucking, wheelie dropping...etc...

    I still love to ride my 26'er and do it on a regular basis though.
    26? What's the point??!!-20170609_222658.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26? What's the point??!!-img_20170528_012930.jpg  


  46. #546
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgestone14 View Post
    Is that a homegrown?
    It's a 26" 853 steel Airborne track end single speed. Sorry, it's a bad photo for the details. I'm not sure of the vintage. Believe it's from around 2000. It has V brakes.


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  47. #547
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    As the author of this thread and a current enthusiast and regular rider of my 26" hardtail, I believe I deserve I little bit of grace for what I'm about to say.

    My Stache is basically the modern 29+ equivalent to my 26'er. Both similar styles of bikes in that they're both All Mountain Hardtails. Both similar head angles, builds, and fork travel...

    ...my Stache is better at absolutely everything than my 26'er. Climbing, descending, level winding through the woods, monster trucking, wheelie dropping...etc...

    I still love to ride my 26'er and do it on a regular basis though.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I hear you. I have a surly krampus that I absolutely love for its go-anywhere attitude. Its simply the diminishing availability of 26ers thats disconcerting.

    For me, I want to start bikepacking and am not a terribly tall fellow, meaning 29er tires dont give me much room above the tires for seat and bar bags. My LHT is a 26er but itd be nice to get mtb geometry for bikepacking.

    luckily, there are still a few options left but it takes us buying them to ensure their survival.

  48. #548
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    I broke my derailleur cable on my Enduro 29 (2017) and "had to take" my old stumpjumper evo 26" the weekend.
    And wow! had forgotten how fun that bike was! It just so fun to handle in tight corners and technical descends, so easy to lift and throw the bike around. With the Enduro you just roll with the bike.

    So now I looking into if I can afford to upgrade the fork and start using it on trail riding and keep the Enduro fr Downhill.

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