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  1. #1001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honda Guy View Post
    Edit: Just realized steel calf was talking 700 euros, not usd.
    nope it's actually 600 euros which equals 660$

  2. #1002
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    They did the same thing with the women version, the Ruze. They made way too many and basically carried over the 2016 as 2017 models. nothing changed.

    The OEM Suntour fork is surprisingly decent. Its an air spring with aluminum stanchions and while not the lightest or most fancy, it isnt something you feel the need to rip off the bike 5 minutes into the ride.

    For BB height, it really isnt bad. I'm running 2.8s (with a 140mm Pike) so my bb is right aroaund stock height and I dont notice a ton of pedal strikes. On paper it is much lower than say a stumpjumper, but since a Fuse is a hardtail you dont get any sag in the rear so it is actually higher than a lot of full squish bikes under load.
    14 Aurum, 16 Fuse, 17 T130

  3. #1003
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    FYI: I am virtually positive, if the EU dealer ships to the USA, and obeys shipper/import regulations (e.g. fills out proper and required legal documentation), buyers must prepare to write a check to the shipper, who collects a so-called "broker fee" which they forward to USA Customs (tariff).

    I routinely import and write such checks. I wrote a check yesterday for $39 to UPS for electronics from the Netherlands valued around $900 (tariff rate about 4%). I have absolutely no idea the rate for bicycles. Anyone?

    In a few cases I received broker fee in the mail one-two weeks after merchandise arrived. Beware the shipper collects this bill on behalf of the US Federal Government. Let us know how it works out if you toss the bill in the non-recirculating file.

    I presume in the USA this bike is considered gray market, zero warranty, not that that should deter anyone considering it's about half dealer cost, albeit on equivalent 2016 USA model with a host of "differences" listed by SC (thank you SC).

    If the shipper ignores and/or violates US import regulations, all bets off above. Shipping, even via BikeFlights, estimate $500 from EU to USA. Shipping might also be taxed under USA Tariff fee. This looks more and more like an EU deal only to me, bad value for USA.
    jimbo

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  4. #1004
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    Mr Lynch

    Is your offer of the stock OEM Ruze wheels still good?

    Thanks, Gary

  5. #1005
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    Moderator, please immediately delete this and spank me as needed. Sorry if this offends readers.

    2016 Fuse Comp OEM tires on front/rear wheel set. Tires have very good tread. Rims straight, no dings. Did not need it, but just trued by Joy Ride Bikes, Logan, UT.

    Specialized OEM tires have excellent tread, but Dylan at JR inspected both wheels today and agrees the tread weaves L/R at speed. Both wheel assemblies are perfect. Bearings fine, dead quiet, no drag, etc. Dylan is surprised I noticed the weave, but I did, so "there we are" as my aunt Celia used to say. Not felt on the trail, but I ride a lot on pavement and corner hard.

    $225/pr and I'll ship today. I have USPS vendor 10% discount. For quickest delivery, IMO the best bet is for me to bring the wheels/tires to my local FX one mile N. The USU co-eds at FX are thorough and meticulous, packed safely for me many times, and barely charge more than materials cost.
    Last edited by ro7939; 05-09-2017 at 01:11 PM.
    jimbo

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  6. #1006
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    Quote Originally Posted by ro7939 View Post
    This looks more and more like an EU deal only to me, bad value for USA.
    nope. Look at the spec of our Fuse Comp and compare it with the US. You get what you pay for, they're not giving them away for nothing.

  7. #1007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    nope. Look at the spec of our Fuse Comp and compare it with the US. You get what you pay for, they're not giving them away for nothing.
    $660 bike + $550 BikeFlights (I priced about three weeks ago) = $1210 + unknown USA Customs Tariff = X. Add for insurance unless your crystal ball says no, estimate $50. We're at $1260 not counting unknown import tariff.

    Some USA dealer might charge only a little more than that for a 2017 with the nice upgrades you listed above (thanks again) and a warranty. Doubtful the EU bike has a warranty. It's a gray market item.

    I just bought a nice used 2016 Comp w/$550 upgrades ($2050 new SRP) for $1250. I suggest you accurate identify the USA Customs Tariff, list a link for same, then readers can decide how good is the price of the EU bike + all the associated fees. It's gonna be double the cost in EU, don't you agree?

    BTW, I imported tens of thousands of dollars of merchandise from world over. If USA buyer thinks Sam is not gonna collect a tariff for this bike, I'll bet you a pair of tires that's dead wrong. Your gonna pay a tariff on this. If you get away with defrauding Sam, and Sam finds out, the original tariff shall be a picnic because Sam is gonna put some pain into your year you are not gonna forget. Fines and penalties shall be epic.

    Sam shall laugh at you when you point blame to the EU dealer for not filling out the proper documentation, again, if they find out. It's the law whether you know it or not.

    Tip: if you buy this bike and don't pay the tariff, never, ever, ever disclose to anyone the source of the bike. Of course, there's a permanent record for eternity of money changing hands, but just keep it to yourself. All it takes is one wrong pair of ears to make you have a bad year (not a bad day or month).
    jimbo

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  8. #1008
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    Quote Originally Posted by ro7939 View Post
    $660 bike + $550 BikeFlights (I priced about three weeks ago) = $1210 + unknown USA Customs Tariff = X. Add for insurance unless your crystal ball says no, estimate $50. We're at $1260 not counting unknown import tariff.

    Some USA dealer might charge only a little more than that for a 2017 with the nice upgrades you listed above (thanks again) and a warranty.
    What I meant is that the bike is cheap in absolute numbers but the 2017 US model has much better spec which kinda justifies the huge price difference IMO so you're not missing out on anything here. I'd actually rather have the US model myself and pay more as buying a cheap bike which I consider spec wise as a compromise.

    I ordered two myself (1 for riding, 1 as spare) and shall receive them end of this month if I don't cancel the order before.

  9. #1009
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    SC,
    You're in Europe, right?
    jimbo

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  10. #1010
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    Quote Originally Posted by ro7939 View Post
    SC,
    You're in Europe, right?
    yes I'm from Austria, like stated in my user profile. Why is everyone automatically assuming I'm from the US here

  11. #1011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    yes I'm from Austria, like stated in my user profile. Why is everyone automatically assuming I'm from the US here
    I knew you were in Europe, just confirming the obvious. I searched for your geographic location and did not find it in your Profile.

    I am familiar with a not so great habit of some fellow Americans viewing the world through USA-colored glasses. I deal with persons in my business from all over the globe, have made internet friends with persons in Africa, Europe (esp. Poland, Germany, Norway, England), Asia, Singapore, Thailand, etc, etc, etc. I never presume someone's country of origin.

    One of my best clients in Norway owns our speaker system valued around $13k.

    Thanks again for your great post on the USA Comp upgrades for 2017.
    jimbo

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  12. #1012
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    Hello I read a lot of positive feedback about the use of longer 140/150mm forks on the Fuse. Please note that the Fuse 2017 model got a new frame with more clearance so improvements in bottom bracket height are more relevant to Fuse 2015-2016 owners.

    I called Manitou today and was told it is indeed possible to pump the travel of the Manitou Magnum Comp+ fork from 120 to 140mm. However I wasn't told if I need to buy the 140mm airshaft assembly as listed in the explosion view of this pdf:

    https://www.manitoumtb.com/wp-conten...ide-REV2.1.pdf

    Did any of the Fuse Expert owners here ever tried this? The procedure is similar to other Manitou forks and can be googled online.

    I also called Suntour Europe and was told it is not possible to raise the travel of the Raidon+ forks specced on the Fuse comp, so the bottom bracket issue can only be fixed on the Fuse Expert model.

  13. #1013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Lynch View Post
    Large all the way. Im 5'10 with a 31" inseam and the large fits great. I run a 125mm dropper and a 50mm stem. Its very comfortable.
    With a 34.5" inseam you could run a 150mm dropper on a large, and maybe swap to a 40mm stem if you have a shorter torso and the reach feels a bit long.
    A medium is going to be way too small. My 5'4 wife rides a medium.
    Quote Originally Posted by WMBigs View Post
    5'10" 34" inseam. Tested the medium, felt really small. Ordered the large, great fit for me.
    I could actually testride the Fuse Comp and Fuse Expert in both framsizes today.


    I'm 5'11" with 34.5" inseam.

    Before entering the store I was ready to order the Expert model in size Large but ended up with the Comp model in size Medium. How come?

    Components:
    The Suntour Raidon fork on the cheaper Comp model outclasses the Manitou Magnum fork on the Expert model so much that it's almost embarassing. Sorry Manitou but your fork is shit! (I actually had two different testbikes of each fork to make that assessment)

    The Expert model also comes with some Sram DB3 brakes which are still based on their old "Taperbore" technology - yes the type of lever technology that eventually made Sram drop the Avid brand off his brakes after years of struggling to make these brakes work. The TRP brakes on the Comp appear to be of much higher quality, the bite point is better and the lever feels more ergonomic. Oh by the way the red colour of the Comp is just a knockout!

    Frame Sizing
    Let's face it: On the Fuse size L I've less standover height than I have over the toptube of my Kona Rove ST which is a Gravelbike!
    I don't want to bust my balls on the trail so that alone is kind of a "knock out criteria" for the Large frame. Furthermore the frame feels too long, I did fit much better on the medium frame with a slightly longer 60mm stem and a handlebar with less backsweep and 20mm rise.

    I also did the math and compared raw geometry numbers of my current bike, a Giant Trance SX size L, the Fuse size M is indeed much closer to my size L Trance than the size L Fuse is. I know I contradict the majority of riders here but there's no way the size L would have fit me. It's too long, the toptube is too high and the bike feels more like a truck with thick tires. That's my final assessment after 2 hours in total with both framesizes.

  14. #1014
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    Perfect example why people should test ride and not listen to idiots on the internet!

    My only real complain about the large is how tall it is. I actually like the look and clearance on the Ruze much better! It looks like a Stumpjumper.
    14 Aurum, 16 Fuse, 17 T130

  15. #1015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I could actually testride the Fuse Comp and Fuse Expert in both framsizes today.


    I'm 5'11" with 34.5" inseam.

    Before entering the store I was ready to order the Expert model in size Large but ended up with the Comp model in size Medium. How come?

    Components:
    The Suntour Raidon fork on the cheaper Comp model outclasses the Manitou Magnum fork on the Expert model so much that it's almost embarassing. Sorry Manitou but your fork is shit! (I actually had two different testbikes of each fork to make that assessment)

    The Expert model also comes with some Sram DB3 brakes which are still based on their old "Taperbore" technology - yes the type of lever technology that eventually made Sram drop the Avid brand off his brakes after years of struggling to make these brakes work. The TRP brakes on the Comp appear to be of much higher quality, the bite point is better and the lever feels more ergonomic. Oh by the way the red colour of the Comp is just a knockout!

    Frame Sizing
    Let's face it: On the Fuse size L I've less standover height than I have over the toptube of my Kona Rove ST which is a Gravelbike!
    I don't want to bust my balls on the trail so that alone is kind of a "knock out criteria" for the Large frame. Furthermore the frame feels too long, I did fit much better on the medium frame with a slightly longer 60mm stem and a handlebar with less backsweep and 20mm rise.

    I also did the math and compared raw geometry numbers of my current bike, a Giant Trance SX size L, the Fuse size M is indeed much closer to my size L Trance than the size L Fuse is. I know I contradict the majority of riders here but there's no way the size L would have fit me. It's too long, the toptube is too high and the bike feels more like a truck with thick tires. That's my final assessment after 2 hours in total with both framesizes.
    I must admit, the first time I rode the Manitou magnum I was a bit confused. It wasn't until I did my research and returned to the shop with knowledge of the fork and a shock pump in hand. First things first, the 34mm magnum is not an xc fork, it is a progressive trail fork tuned for plus bikes with attitude. The tire is supposed to absorb the small hits and the fork will take care of the left over gnar. You will be hard pressed to bottom this fork out unless you are hitting some serious shit. That said, the radion is a flexy piece of shit tard that bottoms out on a mediocre bunny hop and is likely to put one in the hospital.. I get it, it feels more plush and uses all the travel in the parking lot, but at the end of the day it will leave you wanting more and limit the frames capability. The magnum on the other hand only gets better as the oil seals get broken in and you start upping the pressure. I started at -20 psi from recommended pressure when brand new. Don't get me wrong, it's no high end pro, pike, or kashima but it gets the job done. The 16 fuse with its low bottom bracket, short stays, and slack head tube is designed to be taken down some serious trail. There is a reason they pussified the 17 model, appeal to the masses.. If you seek intermediate trail or lots of up hill battles search else where or you will be disappointed with pedal strikes, wandering front ends, and lots of unused potential suspension travel, maybe the 18 model will come with a 100mm sid, a pair of carbon cranks, and ikon 2.8s.. Im sure that will feell great. Radion better tham the magnum? Give me a break.. Thats like saying a ground beef patty is better than a T-bone steak.

  16. #1016
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    Look I'm just posting my observations based on the four bikes I tried where two of them had the Magnum fork while the other two came with the Suntour. The way how the Suntour outperformed the Manitou fork surprised me a lot as I was already prepared to order the Expert model with the "better" manitou fork.

    Interestingly enough the mechanic of the store said something similar along the lines so that's not just my opinion here.

    Of course I had my shock pump with me and lowered the air pressure all the way to the lowest setting of 70psi to see if it improves the situation, playing with rebound and low speed compression knob too, it's not my first test ride you know.

    No offense meant but if you don't even have a shock pump @home and need to return to the store for that I doubt you're in a position to challenge my competence here, just saying the Manitou is better than the Suntour based on the name alone is not very reasonable.

  17. #1017
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    I've been test riding the Fuse Comp and the Fuse Sport.. and trying to read what everyone here has been saying.. But, folks keep mentioning the Manitou Magnum and the 2017 Fuse (Comp) is built with the Manitou machete. Just wondering if anyone has this particular version and how they like it? I've tried to go through the 21 pages here, but I really didn't find anything.. I'm a MTB newbie, so I'm trying to find a bike that's good for me that I won't outgrow in a few months.

  18. #1018
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    Quote Originally Posted by motosonic View Post
    I've been test riding the Fuse Comp and the Fuse Sport.
    I only know these two bikes from the website as they're not available in Europe but picking the more expensive Fuse Comp over the Fuse Sport is a no brainer IMO:

    Fuse Comp: Better frame with slacker geometry and thru axle rear, Dropper post, better brakes, 11speed drive train (you can upgrade the cassette to 11-50 without further modifications needed), better fork as the Suntour XCR on the Fuse Comp as this is a shit fork IMO (not to confuse with the Suntour Raidon!)

    Just to be clear: Every fork is better than a Suntour XCR, even a "Manitou Machete"

    you must be very desperate to give away all these better components including a better frame just to save 300 bucks

  19. #1019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I only know these two bikes from the website as they're not available in Europe but picking the more expensive Fuse Comp over the Fuse Sport is a no brainer IMO:

    Fuse Comp: Better frame with slacker geometry and thru axle rear, Dropper post, better brakes, 11speed drive train (you can upgrade the cassette to 11-50 without further modifications needed), better fork as the Suntour XCR on the Fuse Comp as this is a shit fork IMO (not to confuse with the Suntour Raidon!)

    Just to be clear: Every fork is better than a Suntour XCR, even a "Manitou Machete"

    you must be very desperate to give away all these better components including a better frame just to save 300 bucks
    Oh I'm not really considering the Sport at all. I'm looking at the Comp at the moment, but, I've read a bunch of people on this thread complaining about the Manitou fork... but, they only mention the "Magnum" not the Machete. Just wondering if the Machete is any better? or should I try to upgrade to the expert (which is an additional $500, so $2000 with the Rock Shox Reba fork).

  20. #1020
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    Quote Originally Posted by motosonic View Post
    people on this thread....

    ...only mention the "Magnum" not the Machete.

    Just wondering if the Machete is any better?
    too bad. You're feeling unlucky today?

    You know I'm a simple man of average intelligence but sometimes I feel as if I've indeed a superior intellect cause in such a case, when I'm unsure how a component is performing, I don't stand still in vain hope of someone reporting but instead google it AND READ WHAT OTHERS HAVE SAY.

    Think about it, the Fuse is not the only bike that comes stock with this fork so there are other places on the Internets to read about it. Hell, there are threads about the Machete in this very forum!

    From my experience with a Levo HT 6fattie last week I wouldn't want the Reba fork either, better buy the Comp and upgrade the Machete later if you feel necessary.

  21. #1021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    Look I'm just posting my observations based on the four bikes I tried where two of them had the Magnum fork while the other two came with the Suntour. The way how the Suntour outperformed the Manitou fork surprised me a lot as I was already prepared to order the Expert model with the "better" manitou fork.

    Interestingly enough the mechanic of the store said something similar along the lines so that's not just my opinion here.

    Of course I had my shock pump with me and lowered the air pressure all the way to the lowest setting of 70psi to see if it improves the situation, playing with rebound and low speed compression knob too, it's not my first test ride you know.

    No offense meant but if you don't even have a shock pump @home and need to return to the store for that I doubt you're in a position to challenge my competence here, just saying the Manitou is better than the Suntour based on the name alone is not very reasonable.
    70 psi is your problem. Way too much pressure for the fork brand new unless you are very heavy. Should be around 40 - 50 psi. The fork was probably still too stiff. Even at those low pressures with a kick of compression damping dialed in it will still be tough to bottom out. It's hard to JUDGE a bike at a bike store with salesmen around..

    And leave my shock pump out of this, it has nothing to do with you!

  22. #1022
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    I must say though, I don't think anyone loves the magnum when they first try it out. It took me much longer to dial in than any fork I have forked before.

  23. #1023
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    Quote Originally Posted by lo@nRider View Post
    70 psi is your problem. Way too much pressure for the fork

    And leave my shock pump out of this, it has nothing to do with you!
    70psi is "not my problem" with you not even knowing my weight and riding style. Sorry but I won't get lectured about setting up a fork by a noob who doesn't even own a shockpump.

    And I didn't have a salesman around, I was riding and setting up the bike myself.

    In fact with 70psi, which was way below my weight, the fork felt too soft but still not really plush, like a component that needs to be convinced to work. Same thing on the other bike, would've been a huge coincidence to get two faulty forks on one day?

    I tried many bikes with different forks over the years and always try to set them up the best way possible but that Manitou fork just wouldn't deliver. Remember I primarily went into the store checking the size, the fork was just an afterthought.

    In fact one of the shop owners told me that he's amazed that Manitou is still in business after all these years and doesn't understand why Specialized is speccing these forks on their bikes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    70psi is "not my problem" with you not even knowing my weight and riding style. Sorry but I won't get lectured about setting up a fork by a noob who doesn't even own a shockpump.

    And I didn't have a salesman around, I was riding and setting up the bike myself.

    In fact with 70psi, which was way below my weight, the fork felt too soft but still not really plush, like a component that needs to be convinced to work. Same thing on the other bike, would've been a huge coincidence to get two faulty forks on one day?

    I tried many bikes with different forks over the years and always try to set them up the best way possible but that Manitou fork just wouldn't deliver. Remember I primarily went into the store checking the size, the fork was just an afterthought.

    In fact one of the shop owners told me that he's amazed that Manitou is still in business after all these years and doesn't understand why Specialized is speccing these forks on their bikes.
    Did I say I didn't have a shock pump? NO, quit flying off half cocked. My original reference to a shock pump was to illustrate the fact that fork needs effort to get dialed in, as do all. It sounds like you and the shop you frequent dislike Manitou. They happen to be a popular brand in my area.


    That said, if I were in the market for a fuse today I would get the 16 comp in red or white for 1,099 or less on close out. Throw on a set of hopes laced to ARC 40's and swap the Radion for a YARI 130. Cost would be around 2K and the performance would be significantly better than the new Expert model.

  25. #1025
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    Quote Originally Posted by lo@nRider View Post
    I must say though, I don't think anyone loves the magnum when they first try it out. It took me much longer to dial in than any fork I have forked before.
    maybe. I haven't ridden many Manitou forks over the years, most test bikes these days are usually specced with Fox/Rock Shox and they work "out of the box". Saying that the Manitou is great but you need to break it in first sounds kinda reasonable but why should I cope with a product from a looser company like Manitou when I can have a fork that works better from the start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lo@nRider View Post
    Did I say I didn't have a shock pump? NO, quit flying off half cocked. My original reference to a shock pump was to illustrate the fact that fork needs effort to get dialed in, as do all. It sounds like you and the shop you frequent dislike Manitou. They happen to be a popular brand in my area.


    That said, if I were in the market for a fuse today I would get the 16 comp in red or white for 1,099 or less on close out. Throw on a set of hopes laced to ARC 40's and swap the Radion for a YARI 130. Cost would be around 2K and the performance would be significantly better than the new Expert model.
    I'll have to see if I can even find a 2016 anywhere. The shop I went to last night didn't have any and they have 4 shops with a pretty big inventory.

  27. #1027
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    Quote Originally Posted by lo@nRider View Post
    That said, if I were in the market for a fuse today I would get the 16 comp in red or white for 1,099 or less on close out. Throw on a set of hopes laced to ARC 40's and swap the Radion for a YARI 130. Cost would be around 2K and the performance would be significantly better than the new Expert model.
    Good point. I'm thinking about the same, the Yari fork would raise the bottom bracket a bit, just enough to compensate for lower 2.8" tires.

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    I was ready to hate the Manitou, because it's not Fox. After about 600 trail miles, I really like it. It's stout- the crank should be called "Hefty"- without being stupid heavy, and with the right pressure the clicker is all I need to adjust for trails. Well, and the right tire pressure. It's a great adjustable fork that hasn't puked its guts out and doesn't buckle under pressure. I'll probably keep it when I unload the bike for something Carbon.
    Why Spech chose it? Price for features, I'm sure- but it's the best part of the bike so far.

    Forget it- you know what you're doing, you'll be happy with whatever you choose.

  29. #1029
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    Quote Originally Posted by motosonic View Post
    I'll have to see if I can even find a 2016 anywhere. The shop I went to last night didn't have any and they have 4 shops with a pretty big inventory.
    Damn, there are 6 here in Austin size M, L and XL just chilling.. If only I could have waited a little longer. No red ones though, so I'm not that upset about it.

  30. #1030
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    I'm not a Specialized fanboy and don't ride any of their bikes yet but the red coloured 2016 Fuse is probably the most beautiful frame I've ever seen. It's really hard to make a picture that accurately shows the colour.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I'm not a Specialized fanboy and don't ride any of their bikes yet but the red coloured 2016 Fuse is probably the most beautiful frame I've ever seen. It's really hard to make a picture that accurately shows the colour.


    Agreed



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    I have the same red Fuse and I get tons of positive comments on its looks. Thinking about big upgrades (carbon wheels, Pike fork, 1x11 drivetrain, etc.) instead of buying a higher end HT + bike.

  33. #1033
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    I ordered the Fuse Comp in M and L size now and will probably sell the components of one bike but keep the frame

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    Quote Originally Posted by oKayH View Post
    I made the switch to 29er wheels on my Fuse this week after a year on plus.

    Plus tires are like a Jeep Wrangler. Not as fast but can crawl up and over anything. Also, they like to carve corners and carry corner speed vs just getting aggressive with them and squaring off turns. The less knobby rears are a little easier to ride like a regular tire.

    29er wheels are like a high end sports car geared for the track. It won't be he most comfortable ride, but man is it agile and ready to respond when you push the pedals. It is a lot easier to handle these at speed with regard to commanding direction changes in a corner. Slideways! 1 ride in and I found a lot of speed and my preferred way of cornering.

    Doing an enduro this weekend on it since my full sus'r went and broke. Will see what the clock says.

    I'll keep both wheelsets, but the plus wheels will be collecting dust for most of the year. I kept killing rear tires and rims no matter what I did to mitigate it.

    You got a picture from the front so I can see the gap? Rear also if possible.

  35. #1035
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    get the specialized keg and the mtb bandit. Works perfect for me.

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    Messed up replying to a post above,sorry guys. Anyways, has any one tired out 2.8 tires on the fuse? I plan on giong on a downiville trip this summer and I'm going to need a beefer tire for those trails.

  37. #1037
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHOAA View Post
    You got a picture from the front so I can see the gap? Rear also if possible.
    Rear is a 2.3 HR2 on a 27 inner width rim.

    Front is just a standard 29er 2.5 in a 29/27.5+ fork.

  38. #1038
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    Fuse Comp 2017 chainring

    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieTolliver View Post
    Yes, that should fit fine.
    Thanks it works fine, the stout crank spider 76bcd its a little bit wide (+/- 1 mm) but with press fits perfectly, the stock bolts are small but with loctite blue threadlocker seals good... xx1 chainring on stout crank spider is possible...Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-img_20170514_203929.jpg

  39. #1039
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    I have a fuse with the 76 bcd stout crank, does anyone know the biggest chainring which fits? 32 or maybe 34

  40. #1040
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    Quote Originally Posted by aGrower View Post
    I have a fuse with the 76 bcd stout crank, does anyone know the biggest chainring which fits? 32 or maybe 34
    I think 32t its the max

    Enviado desde mi FRD-L04 mediante Tapatalk

  41. #1041
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    I don't know if bigger than 32t will fit but Wolf Tooth has a direct replacement in 30t and 32t.

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...bcd-chainrings

    I bought the 32t and will see how that works for me. I replaced the stock chain with a Shimano while I had it off.

    Bob
    [B]Fuse Expert


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    www.robertirvin.com

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    I chucked the Stout over the side for a used X1 carbon crank with a direct mount 30t.
    (Already changed the BB to Wheels Inc- no more creaks)

  43. #1043
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    So I just picked up a 2017 Fuse Expert and after my first 20 miles, here are my initial thoughts. 6'2" and I got a Large because I prefer a smaller cockpit. I maybe should have gotten an XL but the size difference wasn't huge when I tried both. It weighs in right at 30lb out of the bike shop. The size matches up with my Giant Trance which i'm used to. The bottom bracket height seems totally fine and things I would bang my sprockets on before are now cleared so better clearance than a full squish 3x9 bike. The 3" tires are great for some post rain rides I have done and I'm digging the concept. The brakes are not my favorite and I've ordered Guide RS to replace them. The lever reach is too close and however they were set up, the rear brake lever has too much dead zone for my taste. I'm use to Hayes Stroker Trail (10yr old) as a reference.

    I also ordered some Schwalbe Rocket Rons and plan to run them tubeless. I've never run tubeless before and know these Specialized 38mm rims are not designed for tubeless, but I'm going to give it a shot based on various MTBR posts. I'm interested in a light weight tubeless setup and may go with a heavier tire if I have issues with these thinner and lighter tires.

    I'm not that stoked on the rear brake line running along the down tube instead of inside it and the internally routed dropper cable go snagged during my last ride and I had a big cable loop hanging below the bottom bracket so that might need some tape or something to guard against more snags.

    Overall, I had a lot of fun riding a hard tail with 3" tires. In some ways it was less work with the bigger tires and the efficient pedaling, and in other ways it took more work to work my legs more over rocks and roots and such but I felt like I earned the ride a little more. Oh yeah, it's my first bike with a dropper post and I won't likely go back now.

    The gearing is good but I do wish I had just a bit more range. A 50T rear cog would be great and would allow me to bump the front up to 30 or 32. I hesitate to give up the climbing granny gear by sizing up the front sprocket as is. Maybe with some more fitness I'll do that later.

    I especially look forward to next winter with some snow covered trails up here in CT and I might try a little downhilling up in VT with it too just for giggles. If I trash the wheels then I will just have to upgrade!

    That's about it for initial thoughts, the price to fun ratio in this bike is quite good!

  44. #1044
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    I am looking at getting either a fuse comp or a fuse expert and wanted some opinions on the parts difference. It looks like it comes down to just a couple items, really -

    forks - RockShox Reba RL vs Manitou Machete
    drivetrain - SRAM GX vs SRAM NX
    brakes - TRP Slate X2 vs custom DB-3 (SRAM? Avid? guessing from the name)

    Are these upgrades worth the $400-500 price difference?

  45. #1045
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    I have a 2017 Expert as well. When I took it home from the dealer, they confirmed that the rims were tubeless ready and provided me with valve stems. Sure enough, the rims were pre-taped and it has been set up tubeless and working flawlessly since the 2nd ride. Enjoy!

  46. #1046
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    I considered the same calculations of the comp vs the expert. For my money, I thought it was worth it and went with the expert. Now, however, I'm considering a slightly bigger fork. Would I do it again? Probably. I think the SRAM GX is pretty good.

  47. #1047
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    Quote Originally Posted by hgravez View Post
    I have a 2017 Expert as well. When I took it home from the dealer, they confirmed that the rims were tubeless ready and provided me with valve stems. Sure enough, the rims were pre-taped and it has been set up tubeless and working flawlessly since the 2nd ride. Enjoy!
    That's great news. I guess I have an unneeded roll of tape. Did you use the stock Ground Control tires or swap them out?

  48. #1048
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    Quote Originally Posted by krel View Post
    I am looking at getting either a fuse comp or a fuse expert and wanted some opinions on the parts difference. It looks like it comes down to just a couple items, really -

    forks - RockShox Reba RL vs Manitou Machete
    drivetrain - SRAM GX vs SRAM NX
    brakes - TRP Slate X2 vs custom DB-3 (SRAM? Avid? guessing from the name)

    Are these upgrades worth the $400-500 price difference?
    If you are likely to change the fork I might go Comp. If you want a lighter and better fork but don't need more than the Reba, and plus get some better components, then maybe get the Expert. Basically you are buying a lighter weight bike and a better fork with the expert. At least that was my rational.

  49. #1049
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    The new beast

    I got this about a month ago. Did some replacement parts also. I got a new 2016 Fuse Pro for a killer deal $2300 OTD. I changed the fork to a Pike 140 RC3 ( mainly because the steer tube was not long enough on the stock Reba)(why specialized cuts them so low is beyond me) I added some Race Face Next carbon bars 20mm rise 35 clamp and a Race Face turbine 50mm stem but today put a Rental 40mm stem on it ( it turns so fast ). I had the brakes warrantied and got Level TL as a replacement. I put a Henge TI saddle on it and some Maxxis tires tubeless.

    Future upgrades will be new brakes so I have a 4 piston in the rear and some specialized SL Fattie rims. Most likely go to Schwalbe RR tires too and maybe get a set of 29er wheels and tires. Any way I am getting use to it still. This was my second ride today.Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-img_2988.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-img_2986.jpg  

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-img_2987.jpg  


  50. #1050
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    Quote Originally Posted by ski1970 View Post
    I changed the fork to a Pike 140 RC3 ( mainly because the steer tube was not long enough on the stock Reba)(δ

    Future upgrades will be new brakes so I have a 4 piston in the rear
    that short steer tube must have been a real bummer...

    I'm having the same issue on mine but just bought a riser bar for 50$

    A 4 piston brake is not more powerful than a 2 piston brake just because the numbers of pistons is double but "upgrade" whatever you think is necessary, don't forget about the frame

  51. #1051
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    The steer tube sucked. I had to do the same thing on my wife Fuse Pro. I got her bike a year ago and got her a new Reba right off the bat. She has a XL due to her hight and the bikes front end was to low for her.

    From what I have read it does slow you faster due to more friction spread throughout the break surface which does slow you faster and give you more bite. ( maybe a bigger rotor would work too) I have always used Guid RSC on every previous bike and do not remember the rear break being so weak. I have rode them on this same downhill section too.

  52. #1052
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    I've been happy with the brakes as delivered on my '16 Expert, but I can always appreciate "more".

    Couldn't stand the stock wide bar, mounted an Easton EC70 riser- then saw the Ritchey Bullmoose carbon that reminded me of the bar on my '86 Stumpy- just had to have it. Fixed, flat, 70mm x 720 and not coming loose in the stem.

  53. #1053
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    Really loving my Fuse, definitely one of my most loved bikes of all time. Have a pair of 29x2.6 Nobby Nics on their way to put on some Roval Fattie SL 29 wheels. Edit: have no idea how to rotate this picture, even editing the pic and re-uploading doesn't fix it. Mods?

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-s-works-fuse.jpg

  54. #1054
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    How do these things climb? I've heard they can be a little sluggish. is that true?

  55. #1055
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    Quote Originally Posted by ski1970 View Post
    I got this about a month ago. Did some replacement parts also. I got a new 2016 Fuse Pro for a killer deal $2300 OTD. I changed the fork to a Pike 140 RC3 ( mainly because the steer tube was not long enough on the stock Reba)(why specialized cuts them so low is beyond me) I added some Race Face Next carbon bars 20mm rise 35 clamp and a Race Face turbine 50mm stem but today put a Rental 40mm stem on it ( it turns so fast ). I had the brakes warrantied and got Level TL as a replacement. I put a Henge TI saddle on it and some Maxxis tires tubeless.

    Future upgrades will be new brakes so I have a 4 piston in the rear and some specialized SL Fattie rims. Most likely go to Schwalbe RR tires too and maybe get a set of 29er wheels and tires. Any way I am getting use to it still. This was my second ride today.
    Nice, I've got the same one, and also got a sweet deal on the 2016 version. I like how it is spec'd out - the XO mech and S2000 carbon crankset is a nice touch.

    I made some similar changes - Renthal bar with a bit of rise and shorter stem. I'd love a longer steertube as well, but wasn't quite ready to spring on a whole new fork.

    I also mounted a Wolf Components CAMO oval chainring, a pair of Bontrager Line Pro 40 27.5" carbon wheels (great price as a Trek take-off), and a crane bell (ding!).

    Tell me more about warrantying the DB5 brakes - one of mine seized up on day 2, and the shop replaced it while I waited with another DB5. They've worked fine since then, but I'd be interested how you arranged to get moved to the newer line of brakes. Do they have the same shifter and dropper lever integration?

  56. #1056
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisSp8s View Post
    That's great news. I guess I have an unneeded roll of tape. Did you use the stock Ground Control tires or swap them out?
    I have stuck with the stock tires. I actually like them a lot. I think the sidewalls are pretty sturdy and I haven't felt squirm or folding at pretty low pressures (13/14 psi in rear, 11/12 in front). For reference, I'm about 165lbs with all my gear.

  57. #1057
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    My DB5s were warrantied as well. I simply told them that they kept seizing - and that I understand others have had the same problem - and they called me to tell me they were replacing them with Guides. However, I'm done with Sram's terrible brakes. So, I put on a pair of XTs.

  58. #1058
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    Quote Originally Posted by motosonic View Post
    How do these things climb? I've heard they can be a little sluggish. is that true?
    Sure, they aren't as fast as a lighter bike with narrower tires...but, they grip like none other, are a blast to flick around and simply scream downhill. So. Much. Fun.

  59. #1059
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    Anyone put goop or slime in their tyres? Was wondering what quantity to put in. Was thinking around 150ml?

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    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-img_0288.jpg

    Obligatory photo attached. Hopefully...

  61. #1061
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    Anyone here try this yet?

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...am-and-sunrace



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  62. #1062
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    Quote Originally Posted by krel View Post
    Anyone here try this yet?
    I considered it once for like 5 seconds, but what is it good for?

    For less money you could buy a sunrace 11-46 or 11-50 cassette

    At least the description on the page
    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...am-and-sunrace
    is a hint that a Sram 1x 11 derailleur will work with a 50T cog on a hardtail (not so sure about full suspension bike due to chain growth)

  63. #1063
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    Looks like less $ than a 50t cassette, reasonable upgrade for 40t cassette- if you need more.
    I'd do the 40t upgrade to a 10-speed 36.

  64. #1064
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    Not sure which prices you're referring to but in Europe a 11-46 cassette is about half the price of this ridiculous expensive 49T cog and the newly announced but still hard to get 11-50 cassette also comes in cheaper.

    The 40T cog is "only" 50% more expensive than a sunrace 11-40/11-42 cassette, not exactly a bargain either.

  65. #1065
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    Hey I have a question about bike fit, I just became the owner of a 2016 fuse comp, thing is I'm 5'8" and the bike is a size small (long story how this happened). Anyway I'm interested in seeing if I can make it work, on paper I should be a medium but the reach seems close to some other brand's medium -frame reach.... I've ordered a 60cm stem to see how an extra 15mm feels up front. I've got the seat jacked all the way up to get the leg room... I guess my question is if anyone else is working with a frame that's a shade too small, by choice or by accident? If so, what have you learned? Thx...

  66. #1066
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    Quote Originally Posted by JScoot View Post
    on paper I should be a medium
    I've ordered a 60cm stem
    my question is if anyone else is working with a frame that's a shade too small, by choice or by accident? If so, what have you learned? Thx...
    It all comes down what you wanna do with the bike.

    Depending on your inseam / arm length there might be a good chance to make this work. I actually choose to be in a similar situation, even after testriding both framesizes I ordered the Fuse in both size M and L despite my measurements 5'11"/34.5" clearly pointing towards an L.

    I already rode the size L yesterday for 2 hours and believe that the M frame with a 60mm stem is a better fit than the L with a 45mm stem, I can put on a long 175mm dropper post and riser bars on the medium frame while the standover of the L is klling me.

    It's important to remember that the Fuse is not just a XC hardtail with thicker tires, it's a fun bike that wants to be ridden hard, jumped and sometimes crashed. The geometry approach here is therefore different.

    To give you some inspiration, the guy in this video rides a Ruze size M (slightly larger than a Fuse S) on purpose, a Fuse L wouldn't enable him to flick the bike around and do all the tricks with such an ease

    https://youtu.be/rRY6YC0Qjjk

  67. #1067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    It all comes down what you wanna do with the bike.

    Depending on your inseam / arm length there might be a good chance to make this work. I actually choose to be in a similar situation...

    https://youtu.be/rRY6YC0Qjjk
    Thanks SC, thats's very encouraging. Maybe with some tweaks I'll find I've stumbled into something good. The video is cool too, although.... I have to admit my riding style is a little less advanced. Good to see how flickable and sporty the bike can be though! Stem will be here in a couple days... I also had a Salsa Bend bar lying around, that seems to have opened up the cockpit a bit too!

  68. #1068
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    My riding style isn't that advanced either but I think we should break with this XC fit paradigm here. This bike isn't intended to be used as a long range bomber, it's rather more like a candle that burns twice as bright in half the time. What I mean is it doesn't make nearly as much fun if you buy it with the seating position of a classic 29er hardtail in mind.

    I gonna receive both frame sizes this week and first thing I'll do is put the longer 60mm stem from the L frame on the M frame and the shorter 45m stem from the M frame on the L frame (e.g. exchange them vice versa to harmonise cockpit lengths)

    I also bought a riser bar with less backsweep and should be able to achieve the exact same seating position on both frames, let's see how this turn out.
    Last edited by Steel Calf; 05-21-2017 at 08:32 PM.

  69. #1069
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    Here's another video I found to give you some inspiration what to do with your Fuse.

    It's Chris Akrigg on a 27.5+ hardtail, as you can see he's riding a pretty small frame for his body size but it looks fun:

    https://youtu.be/zQly80iRVag
    Last edited by Steel Calf; 05-21-2017 at 06:30 PM.

  70. #1070
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    Quote Originally Posted by pumpsmynads View Post
    Anyone put goop or slime in their tyres? Was wondering what quantity to put in. Was thinking around 150ml?
    If you are going to convert to tubeless (which you should really consider), then you'll need to use a tubeless sealant like Stans (standard and available everywhere), or Orange Seal (less common, but works great). If you are just using standard tubes, then don't weigh yourself down with slime inside the tubes.

  71. #1071
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    Here's another video I found to give you some inspiration what to do with your Fuse.

    It's Chris Akrigg on a 27.5+ hardtail, as you can see he's riding a pretty small frame for his body size but it looks fun:

    https://youtu.be/zQly80iRVag
    Love that one. MTB roots. Thanks for sharing that.

  72. #1072
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I also bought a riser bar with less backsweep and should be able to achieve the exact same seating position on both frames, let's see how this turn out.
    Yeah, keep us posted!
    I just got back from a short test ride on my "too-small" fuse. When I rode it up and down the street, I was fretting over the feel, size etc.
    When I rode it in the woods, up some chunky stuff, through some flow, then back down some chunk, all I was thinking about was.... this is fun!
    Still gonna add a stem and work on the cockpit, I did have a sense that I could endo more easily than on my 29er.
    Last edited by JScoot; 05-22-2017 at 11:19 AM. Reason: Typo

  73. #1073
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post

    I gonna receive both frame sizes this week and first thing I'll do is put the longer 60mm stem from the L frame on the M frame and the shorter 45m stem from the M frame on the L frame (e.g. exchange them vice versa to harmonise cockpit lengths)

    I also bought a riser bar with less backsweep and should be able to achieve the exact same seating position on both frames, let's see how this turn out.
    Still interested to hear back about how this goes for you. I put a 60mm stem on the small fuse, and it helps a lot, just got back from 16 miles of riding, really no problems at all.

    BUT I do still feel a bit "perched" on top of the bike still, with the seat almost all the way up (set at the "1" mark). I'd like to feel more down in the bike, I think that's even meant to be part of the feel, and I'm missing that even though I am comfortable.

    The size small actually has a 74 degree seat tube (vs. 73 on other sizes) and a longer head tube which complicates direct comparisons.... but I'm wondering about getting a riser bar to try on to see if raising the bars helps me feel more inside it. I could move the stem up and down to adjust the feel of a 40mm riser... Will that contribute to "in the bike" feeling?

  74. #1074
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    I haven't received the bikes yet, I'll post a comprehensive review once I've made up my mind.

  75. #1075
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    I've read in this thread that the Specialized Stout rear hubs from the Fuse 2015-2016 models come with Shimano freehubs. Now I see that some US Fuse 2017 models come with Stout rear hubs that are equipped with Sram 10-42 cassettes, thus they must be equipped with an XD driver body. Does this mean the hub of a 2016 Fuse should be convertible to XD? Or are we talking about different "Stout" hubs here? I haven't seen an XD driver to be sold separately for these hubs yet, they're only available for the Formula hubs of the Fuse Pro.

    Background:
    I need a better climbing gear than 30/40 (you come to Austria and understand...)
    Thus I wanna upgrade the stock 10speed Sram GX 30 / 11-40 to a 11speed setup with wider range cassette

    I could go with...
    30T chainring + sunrace 11-46 (46T cog would work with Sram GX derailleur)
    or
    30/32T chainring + sunrace 11-50 (50T cog works only with Shimano derailleur!)
    or
    28T chainring + Sram XG 1150 10-42 cassette (shifting is better on Sram cassettes IMO)
    or
    26T Gabaruk chainring + leave stock 11-40 cassette (26/11 top speed gear sound awful)

    ...what now?

  76. #1076
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIK ROX View Post
    Really loving my Fuse, definitely one of my most loved bikes of all time. Have a pair of 29x2.6 Nobby Nics on their way to put on some Roval Fattie SL 29 wheels. Edit: have no idea how to rotate this picture, even editing the pic and re-uploading doesn't fix it. Mods?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    How do you like the carbon frame? Have you ridden the aluminum one for comparison?

    I rode a Transition Vanquish this week and I liked it a lot better than my Al Fuse. Considering either getting one of those or a carbon Fuse. Not sure if the difference was the minimal difference in geo or it being a plastic bike.

  77. #1077
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I also bought a riser bar with less backsweep and should be able to achieve the exact same seating position on both frames, let's see how this turn out.
    Hey how much rise will you have in the bars to try to even the frames out?

    I was looking at some 25 vs 40 mm riser bars, leaning 25. Looking at stack heights between S and M, it's only about a 10mm difference, but I think I'd rather overshoot and drop the stem as needed.

    I have a 2016, and I can tell you it has a sunrace cassette (11-40) but I can't tell you if the hub is convertible to XD...

  78. #1078
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    Quote Originally Posted by JScoot View Post
    Hey how much rise will you have in the bars to try to even the frames out?

    I was looking at some 25 vs 40 mm riser bars, leaning 25. Looking at stack heights between S and M, it's only about a 10mm difference, but I think I'd rather overshoot and drop the stem as needed
    I ordered the red 2016 comp in M and L and some handlebars with 20-25mm rise even though the stack difference of both frames is only 14mm.

    However I'm now considering swapping the Suntour Raidon 120mm fork for a Suntour Aion 130mm to be the more elegant solution here, it'll give me a higher handlebar (10mm more travel + I can cut the steer tube to desired length myself), a slacker headangle and raise the rather low bottom bracket a little should I ever want to ride with smaller 2.8" tires

  79. #1079
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I've read in this thread that the Specialized Stout rear hubs from the Fuse 2015-2016 models come with Shimano freehubs. Now I see that some US Fuse 2017 models come with Stout rear hubs that are equipped with Sram 10-42 cassettes, thus they must be equipped with an XD driver body. Does this mean the hub of a 2016 Fuse should be convertible to XD? Or are we talking about different "Stout" hubs here? I haven't seen an XD driver to be sold separately for these hubs yet, they're only available for the Formula hubs of the Fuse Pro.

    Background:
    I need a better climbing gear than 30/40 (you come to Austria and understand...)
    Thus I wanna upgrade the stock 10speed Sram GX 30 / 11-40 to a 11speed setup with wider range cassette

    I could go with...
    30T chainring + sunrace 11-46 (46T cog would work with Sram GX derailleur)
    or
    30/32T chainring + sunrace 11-50 (50T cog works only with Shimano derailleur!)
    or
    28T chainring + Sram XG 1150 10-42 cassette (shifting is better on Sram cassettes IMO)
    or
    26T Gabaruk chainring + leave stock 11-40 cassette (26/11 top speed gear sound awful)

    ...what now?
    Hello,
    I'm also waiting for the delivery of my Fuse Comp from Bike24 (I'm in Belgium)
    I was also wondering about the XD body beeing available or not for that Spe hub... Have you found the answer ?
    Otherwise, my plans for a cheap way of going 11s is : Sunrace 11-46 cassette and Apex shifter (it's the only exact actuation 11s shifter in the sram range).
    The only question is how the X7 mech will handle the 46T cog...
    Cheers

  80. #1080
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    Quote Originally Posted by fabrice View Post
    The only question is how the X7 mech will handle the 46T cog...
    Cheers
    The X7/GX 10speed derailleur is incompatible with a 46T cog, even a 42T could be tricky. I double checked that myself on two bikes, you'll need a Sram 1x11 derailleur and shifter (both NX if you want to stay cheap or GX for best value)

    I already got GX shifter and derailleur today but still no bike and no 11-46 cassette as I was eyeballing the 11-50 but this thread shows that the 50T doesn't work really well with the 1x11 derailleur:
    Sunrace 11-50 cassette

    Even if there was a XD driver available for the Stout hub, I'm unsure if it's a wise upgrade to do:
    - the XD driver would sure cost between 50-100€ (the XD driver for the Specialized Forumula hub is 99$!)
    - the Stout hub itself is very unreliable, the driver would be worthless if the hub is shot within months
    - the Sram XG 1150 cassette would still be 40€ more expensive than the sun race 11-46, the weight advantage is just 70g
    - if you're running a 10-42 cassette rear you'd still have to downsize the front chainring to 28T to have a sufficient low that equals 30/46

    From a financial standpoint switching to a XD 10-42 cassette would cost you about 50 + 40 + 50 = 140-190€ more than a GX 11-46 setup, that's 380€ for just 1 more gear than 30/11-40

    I'd rather upgrade the fork to Suntour Aion for 370€

  81. #1081
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    That's what I suspected with the X7 derailleur (in its specs, it's 36T max)
    Anyway, I don't mind trying, because if it doesn't work, it won't go to the bin and will nicely upgrade my son's bike to 1x11.
    You can mix&match Sram "exact actuation" shifters and derailleurs.
    So all exact actuation MTB or road 10s/11s derailleurs will work with the Apex 11s flatbar shifter. OK, it's not high-end, not that light, not matchmaker compatible, but it's cheap, like 20€.

    You are absolutely right regarding the financial aspects of a XD body conversion : not worth it ! Plus the argument of the low quality Spe hub... Gearswise, you're upgrading from a 360% to 420% cassette, so that's not worthless. Even with a 28T chainring, you are a litter "longer" than 30-11. An 11-46 cassette has even a little less range than a SRAM 10-42, but that's minimal.

    So that's true, the GX 11s + Sunrace cassette upgrade is the solution that makes more sense. Or XT, that's approx on par, or SLX if on a budget.

    BTW, still no call from the delivery company for my Fuse

  82. #1082
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    Quick recap of 16 vs 17?

    I have a line on a good deal on a 16 Expert. I haven't read all 1k posts in this thread, but I do get there are geo and spec differences between 16 and 17. Can someone give me a quick list of the top differences?

    Thanks!
    My kids ride nicer bikes than I do.

  83. #1083
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBoneAz View Post
    Quick recap of 16 vs 17?

    Can someone give me a quick list of the top differences?
    look for my post in this thread regarding this. I recommend you getting the 17 model

  84. #1084
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    Hi all, first post here! I recently bought a second-hand 2015 Fuse Pro and like it a lot. Mine appeared to have barely been ridden and was bought at a significant discount. Some of my impressions may be useful to others thinking of going with a Fuse. I don't see much here about the Pro version, guessing Specialized may have killed it off since it's $3100 retail price was not significantly lower than the $3500 Expert carbon version. I'd think most buyers would have chosen the carbon frame if the prices in a shop were close. I'm 5'11" with a longer than average torso and shorter than average inseam. For me the large size frame is a comfortable fit.

    Brakes levers felt sluggish when I bought it, and they pretty much seized up on my first off-road ride. After reading the (mostly negative) stuff here about the Sram DB5 brakes, I decided to replace rather than spend money getting them serviced. A LBS mechanic said he didn't see the point in working on them either. A buddy had a set of nearly unused XT brakes so that made the decision easier. They were already pre-bled and spacing for mounting the cantilevers was the same as the Srams, he got them installed pretty easily. Stayed with the original rotors, didn't see the need to replace them.

    Went on a ride with the XT brakes installed and it was a night & day difference. With the XT brakes, I could concentrate on the ride rather than fixating on the hardware, a good thing. I'd read here about a lack of modulation with XT brakes but these do not suffer from that, the braking resistance/bite comes on gradually/predictably. There isn't enough bite to do a stoppie - my friend suggested removing the brake pads and sanding them in case the surfaces are glazed. Another suggestion was using alcohol to clean both the pads and the rotors.

    I'm considering a 28T in place of the 30T chainring, my knees aren't what they once were. And I don't think I'd miss a little top-end speed.

    The drop post works great. Being able to adjust the seat height on the fly is a god-send, I feel more confident taking rougher sections with the seat lowered just a bit (or quite a lot) depending on what's required.

    The ride on the 3.0 tires is as you'd expect - plush & forgiving. Have been experimenting with 14 or 15 psi up front, 15 or 16 psi in back. Traction while slowly riding uphill in rooted/rocky terrain is outstanding. I'm able to barrel down rocky trails faster (and with less vibration in my hands/arms/shoulders) than on my previous bike, (ten year old Yeti 575), the larger wheels/tires are really good for that. But for cornering, I'm still getting the hang of moving around the 27.5+ tires, it's a big switch coming from bikes with 26" wheels/2.1" tires.

    The bottom bracket doesn't seem to have too much resistance and there are no squeaks or other unwanted noises. Seems ok there.

    I may have overlooked it, but am wondering about riders who've experimented with 2.8 and/or 2.6 tires on their Fuses. I want to go tubeless and wondering about switching tire sizes too. I could live with a bit less cushion if it makes the steering feel more responsive. But not if it comes at the expense of considerably more pedal strikes. And maybe going tubeless & lowering the rotational weight will make a significant difference in how it feels steering/cornering, dunno, is all new to me.
    I get that the plus tires are really what the Fuse was designed around; I don't want to monkey around if it means losing the main benefits of the plus sizing.

    Great forum here, cheers!

  85. #1085
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    I've got the '16 Fuse Ex, the Stout hubs are cup and cone. Seems the '17 Ex has cartridge bearings. Not saying it's great, just a different animal.
    I upgraded my wheelset to XD driver, GX-11 derailleur and I used that 42-tooth XG-1180 on a class-4 climb last weekend. 20% grade isn't playing!

  86. #1086
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    I have a 2016 comp model, and i think the rear hub is cup and cone. Dont know for sure because i havnt taken it apart, but it feels like the old stuff. Looks bolted together like the old stuff too. The front is sealed caged bearings.

    I have been reading a lot about the bottom bearings, and hub on these being junk, and the steering tube bearings being dry so i did some investigating. Here is what i found.

    There is nothing but "packing" grease in all the bearings. It is a light grease that is used to keep the bearings from rusting in storage. Being in industrial maintenance, i know what this stuff looks, and feels like. It's basically vaseline. All sealed industrial bearings are packaged like this. Obviously Specialized does NOT repack these sealed caged bearings. These bearings in these bikes are not junk. They are top notch. There is a problem with the assembly process that I'm sure Specialized is not aware of.

    When I was an industrial maintenance machinist people would complain about bearings going out, and needing replacement every month. I get in there, and pack them with real grease, and they would last for 3 years or more.

    All you do is get access to one side of the bearing. Make sure everything is clean, clean, clean. take something like a large leather sewing pin, nothing sharp, and carefully stick it in the inside part of the seal where the inner bearing race is. Get behind the seal, and gently pop it out. Get some good grease, and push it into the bearing. Keep pushing it in there until you believe the grease got pushed behind the bearing into the other side. Pop the seal back on, and wipe off the excess. Done!... I bet when most people replace these, they take the new one out of the bag, or box, stick it in the hole, and run it. Stupid, stupid, stupid! No wonder people think the stuff is junk.

    The bearings on the steering shaft have a small gap on the inside that will allow you to pack grease in it.

    I just packed all of mine. Easy peasy. Glad people complained, otherwise i would have ran mine until they were junk never knowing Specialized is making a mistake by not doing anything with these bearings.

    These are standard industrial bearing that can be purchased for probably lots less money from graingers, or mcmaster carr. Bb bearings #NBN 6806RS. front hub bearing #NBK 6902-2RS.

  87. #1087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodasi View Post
    There is nothing but "packing" grease in all the bearings. It is a light grease that is used to keep the bearings from rusting in storage. Obviously Specialized does NOT repack these sealed caged bearings. These bearings in these bikes are not junk. They are top notch. There is a problem with the assembly process that I'm sure Specialized is not aware of.

    When I was an industrial maintenance machinist people would complain about bearings going out, and needing replacement every month. I get in there, and pack them with real grease, and they would last for 3 years or more.

    All you do is get access to one side of the bearing.

    I bet when most people replace these, they take the new one out of the bag, or box, stick it in the hole, and run it. Stupid, stupid, stupid! No wonder people think the stuff is junk.
    finally someone pointing that out!

    I'm doing this exact procedure on every new bike and never had a problem with preworn bearings. Headsets usually last a bikes life. On a full suspension bike it's not just hubs and headset bearings but also all linkage bearings!

    In order to avoid "air pockets" I use a syringe to force the grease behind the balls, here is an older bike I once photographed the whole procedure

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-20140904_201005.jpg

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-20140820_103450.jpg

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-20140904_221718.jpg

    damn they're upside down
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-20140820_200631.jpg  

    Specialized Fuse 6Fattie-20140904_221651.jpg  


  88. #1088
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    Nice... Instead of a syringe you can also use a grease gun, and a needle fitting if you want to go that route. Car quest or advance auto has them for sure. PT "performance tool" part # w54213. They are about 4 bucks. I'm old school, and prefer a good pack.

  89. #1089
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    I haven't received the bikes yet, I'll post a comprehensive review once I've made up my mind.
    Definitely looking forward to reading your thoughts!
    The bikes must have arrived by now, any first impressions?

  90. #1090
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    The bikes are here but I'm moving right now - will report back once the dust has settled!


  91. #1091
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodasi View Post
    When I was an industrial maintenance machinist people would complain about bearings going out, and needing replacement every month. I get in there, and pack them with real grease, and they would last for 3 years or more.
    This is really helpful - you should do a youtube vid for those of us without your experience level. Thanks!
    My kids ride nicer bikes than I do.

  92. #1092
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    Hi all,

    I'm looking for a new bike to substitute my old Trek 6300, and after some investigation and testing I narrowed it down to one of the Specialized Fuses. However, I'm doubting between the different models. In my local shop I could get:

    - Specialized Fuse Expert 2016 for 1300€ including a pair of extra 29er wheels.
    - Fuse Comp 2017 for 1500€.

    I've read through the thread and seen the comparison with the improvements made in 2017 models, and I'm mainly concerned the 10speed 11-40 of the Expert 2016 won't be enough to cover all situations comfortably.
    What do you think? Should I pay 200€ more and loose the extra set of wheels for the 2017 Comp against the 2016 Expert?

    Another option would be to go for Expert 2017 which brings the Reba and GX 11speed, but this is at 2000€ right now, so I should get a good deal to bring it inside my budget...

    What do you think? Any advice will be welcome!
    Thanks!

  93. #1093
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    I just wanted to thank everyone in this thread for all the great info and thought provoking dialogue.

    I pulled the trigger on 2016 Fuse Pro a few months back thanks to a killer deal from my LBS and I couldn't be happier. This was my first new bike since my good ol' mid 90's Rockhopper. Oh my what a difference!

    So far, after a few hundred miles, I'm only changing out the pedals. Not really sure there's much else I should change until things break. We'll see

    Special thanks to DoodAsi for the protip on repacking the bearings

    Keep that dialogue coming!

  94. #1094
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    BCNSurfer, I personally would go with the 2016 and the extra wheelset. I'm always looking for the best deal, and of these two I'd say getting an expert for less than a comp is a win. Especially with extra wheels!
    If you end up wanting 11 speed, you could upgrade for close to the $200 you are saving. Or see if a wider range 10speed cassette would work.
    Just my 2’....

  95. #1095
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    Thanks JScoot!
    But will it be easy to change to a 11Speed later? I've read in this same thread that it's quite hard and expensive to find an 11Speed that fits this specific bike...
    I'll try to go today to the shop and will ask them also about the possibility!

    Thanks!

  96. #1096
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCNSurfer View Post
    But will it be easy to change to a 11Speed later? I've read in this same thread that it's quite hard and expensive to find an 11Speed that fits this specific bike...
    I'll try to go today to the shop and will ask them also about the possibility!

    Thanks!
    Not having tried it, I'll say I don't know. I've been okay with the 10 speed so far.
    I did see this thread though:
    Anyone convert Fuse 6fattie 1x10 to 1x11?

  97. #1097
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    Mmm... It's not clear...

    Well, I went to the shop again and they make me a 10% on the new ones, so the match now is:
    - 2016 Expert + pair of 29er wheels @1300€
    - 2017 Comp @1350€
    - 2017 Expert @1800€

    I'll think about it during the weekend.
    Advices welcome!

  98. #1098
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    Hi Everyone,

    Question on the Fuse 6 (entry level version): https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...6fattie/118357

    Am assuming that this has a straight headtube unlike the higher models which is tapered. Question is will this inhibit you in performing future upgrades fork wise?

    Cheers!

  99. #1099
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbibar View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    Question on the Fuse 6 (entry level version): https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...6fattie/118357

    Am assuming that this has a straight headtube
    It neither contradicts nor confirms that in the official spec sheet but a 1 1/8" straight steer in 2017 is very unlikely.

  100. #1100
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    2016 Fuse Expert Upgrades for Bikepacking

    Hello all, long time lurker, first time poster.

    I've been riding a 2016 Fuse Expert for a little over a year. It has about 800 to 1,000 miles on it. It's seen quite a bit of action all around North America from singletrack to slickrock, bikepacking, and road riding. Lately I've been doing some upgrades as a friend and I will be leaving to do some sections of the Colorado Trail in a month.

    Upgrades from stock:
    Shimano XT brakes, front and back (running on the stock Sram rotors)
    Shimano XT 1x11 RD and shifter
    Wolftooth 30T stainless oval chainring
    Wolftooth GC49 cog and RD cage conversion to make the rear 11-49
    Wolftooth dropper post lever
    Wheels Manufacturing bottom bracket
    Raceface Aeffect cranks
    Shimano XT PD-T8000 SPD dual platform pedals
    Surly Dirt Wizard 3.0 front, Specialized Purgatory Grid 3.0 rear
    WTB Ranger 3.0s for some places
    Full Revelate Designs bikepacking gear

    The Manitou Magnum Comp fork has been ok but I'd appreciate something better now. I have tried tweaking the pressures and rebound but it still sorta "meh". Another reason I want a different fork is to increase the stem height with spacers for a little more comfortable reach geometry and so my handlebar bag does not rub the front tire with every big bump or jump.

    I've ridden a Fox 34 120mm on a plus bike but am considering either a Pike 130mm or Yari 130mm. I've heard the Fox forks can accommodate 29+ and may be more versatile in the long haul. This thing climbs like a monster now and I don't want to screw up the geometry and make it too drifty but would appreciate a stiffer longer travel fork for long mountain descents. A lot of the forks I see are 51mm offset and a 42mm may be better.

    I hate the thought of putting $900 more into a fork this thing but will probably move all these parts over to a FS frame when I come across something I like and put all the stock stuff back on the Fuse.

    What fork should I get? Can I make my fork better? Read somewhere the Comp can be taken from 120mm to 140mm but am not sure where that was and the references on how to do it.

    Thoughts?

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